Sep 22, 2020  
2019-2020 Course Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Course Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions and Outlines


  

  

MnTC Course List  

 

Accounting

  
  •  

    ACCT 1010 - Introduction to Accounting

    Credits: 3
    Hours/Week: Lecture 3 Lab None
    Course Description: This course introduces the practice of accounting. Topics include transaction analysis, double-entry accounting, cash, petty cash, purchases/payables, sales/receivables, and specialized journals. Year-end procedures and financial statement preparation for service and merchandise companies, payroll, inventory valuation, and corporate structure and equity accounting are also covered.
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Introduction to the discipline
    2. Analyzing financial transactions
    3. Examining financial impact of transactions on the accounting equation
    4. Journalizing and posting to ledger accounts
    5. The trial balance
    6. End of period adjustments
    7. The 10-column worksheet
    8. Preparing basic financial statements - income statement a.owners equity statement b.balance sheet c.statement of cash flows
    9. Closing the books
    10. Cash Controls
    11. Bank reconciliations
    12. Petty cash
    13. Cash short/over
    14. Calculating and recording payroll data
    15. Calculating and recording payroll tax expense and deposits
    16. Cash, credit card and credit sales
    17. Specialized journals–cash payments, cash receipts, sales and purchases
    18. Invoices
    19. Cash and trade discounts
    20. Cost of goods sold and gross profit
    21. Preparing expanded financial statements
    22. Basic financial analysis
    23. Bad debts/allowance for bad debts
    24. Merchandise inventory valuation methods
    25. Methods of determining depreciation
    26. Disposal of fixed assets
    27. Corporate structure
    28. Stock transactions
    29. Corporate earnings and distributions (dividends)

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. classify account types.
    2. apply inventory valuation methods.
    3. analyze financial transactions.
    4. record financial transactions.
    5. account for cash/petty cash.
    6. account for service companies.
    7. account for merchandise companies.
    8. prepare year-end accrual accounting activities.
    9. prepare expanded financial statements.
    10. Account for payroll activity.
    11. calculate and record interest on cost of goods sold.
    12. perform basic financial statement analysis.
    13. account for corporate equity.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    ACCT 1020 - Payroll Procedures

    Credits: 3
    Hours/Week: Lecture None Lab None
    Course Description: This course covers the numerous laws pertaining to employment practice and compensation as well as computations and payment of salaries and wages and related taxes. Topics include employment recordkeeping requirements, preparation of the payroll register, individual earnings records, tax reports, and other forms required by government agencies. The accounting procedures necessary to properly prepare accounting transactions are also covered.
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 1010  or ACCT 2020  or concurrently enrolled.
    Note: Students concurrently enrolled in prerequisite course must contact Records Office for verification.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Need for Payroll Records
    2. Wages, Salaries, Overtime Pay
    3. Social Security Tax Laws and Filing Requirements
    4. Social Security Tax Forms
    5. Federal Income Tax Withholding Laws, Methods, Statements, and Returns
    6. Federal Tax Deposits
    7. Unemployment Tax Calculations (Federal and State) Reports and Payments
    8. Payroll Activity and Journalize and Post Payroll Transactions

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. explain the need for payroll records.
    2. compute wages, salaries, overtime pay.
    3. explain Social Security tax laws and filing requirements.
    4. prepare Social Security tax forms.
    5. explain federal income tax withholding laws.
    6. prepare statements, and returns.
    7. prepare federal tax deposits.
    8. explain unemployment tax calculations (federal and state).
    9. prepare reports and payments.
    10. analyze payroll activity.
    11. journalize and post payroll transactions.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    ACCT 1030 - Computerized Accounting Applications

    Credits: 3
    Hours/Week: Lecture None Lab None
    Course Description: This course is a comprehensive overview of QuickBooks Pro software for business. Students will perform multiple accounting transactions and run reports using QuickBooks. These include recording checks/deposits, preparing bank reconciliations, recording sales/receivables, recording purchases/accounts payables, accounting for inventory, recording payroll transactions, recording fixed asset transactions and financial statement preparation. Students will also gain experience writing accounting procedures related to QuickBooks. This course is relevant to prospective students interested in increasing their knowledge of QuickBooks for their business or current accounting position.
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): CAPL 1010  and ACCT 1010  OR CAPL 1010  and ACCT 2020  with grades of C or higher or instructor consent.  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: ACCT 2020  

    Major Content
    1. Introduction to the software
    2. Banking transactions and preparation of bank reconciliations
    3. Sales and receivables transactions
    4. Purchases and payables transactions
    5. Fixed asset transactions
    6. Payroll transactions
    7. Generate financial statements and other QuickBooks reports; exporting report to Excel or Word
    8. Write accounting procedures using QuickBooks

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. record cash transactions.
    2. prepare bank reconciliations.
    3. record sales and accounts receivable transactions.
    4. record fixed asset transactions.
    5. prepare payroll records and record payroll transactions.
    6. account for inventory.
    7. generate financial statements and other QuickBooks reports.
    8. export QuickBooks reports to Excel and Word.
    9. write accounting procedures related to QuickBooks Pro software.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    ACCT 1790 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1-4
    Hours/Week: Lecture None Lab None
    Course Description: An opportunity for an in-depth study of a particular topic.
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): Instructor and dean consent.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    To be determined by the student and instructor on an individual basis.
    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to: To be determined on individual basis according to the nature of the independent study.
    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    ACCT 2020 - Financial Accounting

    Credits: 4
    Hours/Week: Lecture 4 Lab None
    Course Description: This course includes the study of financial accounting concepts through the measurement, communication, and analysis of economic events for the benefit of investors, creditors, and other external users of financial accounting information. Emphasis is on the preparation and analysis of financial statements in a corporate annual report.
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: Ability to add, subtract, multiply, divide, and calculate simple percentages with the use of a calculator.

    Major Content

    1. Adjustments, Financial Statements, and the Quality of Earnings
    2. Communicating and Interpreting Accounting Information
    3. Financial Statements and Business Decisions
    4. Investing and Financing Decisions and the Balance Sheet
    5. Operating Decisions and the Income Statement
    6. Reporting and Interpreting Bonds
    7. Reporting and Interpreting Cost of Goods Sold and Inventory
    8. Reporting and Interpreting Investments in Other Corporations
    9. Reporting and Interpreting Liabilities and the Time Value of Money
    10. Reporting and Interpreting Owners Equity
    11. Reporting and Interpreting Sales Revenue, Receivables, and Cash
    12. The Accounting Cycle
    13. Reporting and Interpreting Long-Lived Assets
    14. Analysis of Financial Statements

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. explain the nature and purpose of generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP), the objective of financial reporting, and related accounting assumptions and principles.
    2. describe the components of the accounting conceptual framework including accounting and business terminology.
    3. evaluate the impact of the omission of financial information on decision making.
    4. apply the accounting equation to analyze business transactions and understand the impact on financial statements.
    5. describe how internal controls are used to manage and control a firm’s resources, minimize risk, and ensure accurate reporting.
    6. explain the financial accounting concepts in the disclosure of information in the footnotes of annual reports.
    7. describe and apply the information conveyed in each of the four basic financial statements and how this information may be used by management, investors, creditors, and regulators.
    8. describe and apply the information conveyed in each of the four basic financial statements and how this information may be used by management, investors, creditors, and regulators.

    9. apply accounting practices to measure, classify, and report current assets accounts receivable and bad debts, short-term investments, inventory and cost of goods sold, and prepaid expenses.

    10. apply accounting practices to measure, classify, and report long-term assets including the acquisition, use, depreciation, and disposal of long-lived assets.

    11. apply accounting practices to measure, classify, and report current and long-term liabilities.

    12. apply issues relating to stockholders’ equity, including the issuance of stock, repurchase of stock, and dividends.

    13. analyze how accounting transactions, the use of different valuation methods, and management estimates can affect assets, liabilities and equity, earnings, and other financial measures.

    14. apply understanding of how operating, investing and financing activities are reported in the statement of cash flows and analyze the impact these activities have on a firm’s performance and solvency.

    15. describe and apply financial performance measures and ratio analysis to compare financial results against expectations, industry standards, and competitors.


    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    ACCT 2025 - Managerial Accounting

    Credits: 4
    Hours/Week: Lecture 4 Lab None
    Course Description: This course introduces the foundations of managerial accounting.  The emphasis is on managements use of accounting information for planning, controlling, and decision making. Topics covered include cost behavior, an overview of job order and process costing, cost volume profit analysis, budgeting, cost analysis, and capital budgeting decisions
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 2020  with a grade of C or higher.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: Experience in the use of Excel.

    Major Content

    1. Managerial Accounting and the Business Environment
    2. Cost Term, Concepts, and Classifications
    3. Job-Order Costing
    4. Process Costing
    5. Capital Budgeting
    6. Cost Behavior: Analysis and Use
    7. Cost-Volume-Profit Relationships
    8. Financial Statement Analysis
    9. Flexible Budgets and Overhead Analysis 10. Profit Planning 11. Relevant Costs for Decision Making 12. Segment Reporting and Decentralization 13. Service Department Costing 14. Standard Costs 15. Statement of Cash Flows 16. Variable Costing: A Tool for Management

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. describe the differences between managerial and financial accounting.

    2. explain the different elements of cost in business organizations; cost behavior; inventory cost flow including cost of good manufactured and cost of goods sold; and how costs are used in planning, control and decision making.

    3. apply traditional and contribution-margin income statements; analyze cost-volume-profit relationships to support managerial planning and control.

    4. analyze costing systems including job-order costing, activity based costing and process costing.

    5. discuss the purposes of budgeting and the master budget, prepare component budget schedules and relate the budget to planning and control to support management decision making.

    6. describe the development and use of standard costs and variance analysis reports; analyze them in support of responsibility accounting and cost management.

    7. analyze various special decisions using relevant costs and benefits analysis to support decision making and analyze short-term and long-term implications.

    8. apply management performance evaluation tools such as the balanced scorecard, operational performance measures and quality measures.

    9. describe management’s decision making process as it relates to product pricing.

    10. apply the concepts of responsibility accounting and decentralization.

    11. apply the concepts of capital budgeting and the concepts underlying strategic capital investment decisions.

    12. explain the impact of a changing business environment on the role of managerial accounting.
    13. explain the role of financial and non-financial accounting information in a company’s decision making environment.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    ACCT 2035 - Fundamentals of Federal Income Tax

    Credits: 3
    Hours/Week: Lecture 3 Lab None
    Course Description: This course is an introduction to taxation policy and the application of that policy to the preparation of federal income tax returns¿individual and corporate. Topics include taxable income, deductions, exemptions, and tax credits.  This course also includes the use of a computer software package.
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 1010  or ACCT 2020  with a grade of C or higher.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Filing Data
      1. Filing Status
      2. Personal and Dependency Exemptions
    2. Determining Tax Liability
      1. Identifying Gross Income
      2. Itemized Deductions
      3. Tax Credits
    3. Business Return for the Individual
    4. Returns for a Corporation, Limited Liability Company, and Partnership
    5. Tax Administration
      1. Filing Requirements
      2. Penalties

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. demonstrate a basic understanding of federal income tax returns for corporations.
    2. demonstrate a basic understanding of federal income tax returns for limited liability companies.
    3. demonstrate a basic understanding of federal income tax returns for partnerships.
    4. demonstrate a basic understanding of the Internal Revenue Code.
    5. prepare a basic federal income tax return for individuals.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    ACCT 2050 - Financial Accounting II

    Credits: 4
    Hours/Week: Lecture None Lab None
    Course Description: This course provides an in-depth presentation of accounting for balance sheet accounts, financial statement preparation and analysis. This course expands on financial accounting topics such as inventory and financial statement analysis.
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 1010  or ACCT 2020  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Multi-Step Income Statements
    2. Classified Balance Sheets
    3. Statements of Cash Flows
    4. Cash and Receivables
    5. Inventories
    6. Current and Contingent Liabilities
    7. Investments in Debt and Equity Securities
    8. Long-term Debt
    9. Contributed Capital
    10. Financial Analysis
    11. Retained Earnings

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. prepare multi-step income statements.
    2. account for cash and receivables.
    3. account for inventories.
    4. account for investments in debt and equity securities.
    5. account for current and contingent liabilities.
    6. account for long-term debt.
    7. account for contributed capital.
    8. account for retained earnings.
    9. perform numerous financial analyses.
    10. prepare classified balance sheets.
    11. prepare statements of cash flows.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    ACCT 2099 - Accounting Capstone

    Credits: 3
    Hours/Week: Lecture 3 Lab None
    Course Description: This course requires students to apply financial accounting concepts and examine current issues in the accounting profession. Topics covered include developing work papers, writing accounting reports, understanding accounting documents, and developing the accountant-client relationship.
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 1010  or ACCT 2020 , ACCT 2025 , ACCT 2035  AND ENGL 1020  or ENGL 1021  with a grade of C or higher.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: Experience in the use of Excel.

    Major Content
    1. Auditing Issues An Emphasis on Working Papers
    2. Ethics in the Accounting Profession
    3. Financial Accounting Case
    4. Interviewing Clients and Working Relationships from a Diverse Background
    5. Understanding Accounting Documents

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. Conduct interviews with potential clients.
    2. Create and prepare working papers that will provide an audit trail for work completed.
    3. Communicate accounting information through written reports.
    4. Demonstrate an understanding of the cultural issues that need to be addressed when working with clients, coworkers, and supervisors
    5. Demonstrate an understanding of the Code of Ethics that govern the accounting profession.
    6. Demonstrate the ability to solve problems in an accounting information system.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration


Addiction Counseling

  
  •  

    ADCO 1020 - Introduction to Drugs and Alcohol

    Credits: 3
    Hours/Week: Lecture None Lab None
    Course Description: This course provides an overview of classification of mood altering addictions, signs and symptoms of addicted behavior, treatment, prevention, and cultural issues. The course meets the academic coursework requirement for Minnesota Statute 2005, Chapter 148C:  “Overview of alcohol and drug counseling, focusing on the transdisciplinary foundations of alcohol and drug counseling and providing an understanding of theories of Substance Related Disorders, the continuum of care and the process of change.”  Service learning is a component of this course.
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    I. Psychoactive Drugs: History and Classification

    1. Introduction
    2. History of psychoactive drugs
    3. Classification of psychoactive drugs

    II. Heredity, Environment and Psychoactive Drugs

    1. How psychoactive drugs affect us
    2. Levels of drug use
    3. Theories of addiction
    4. Compulsive behavior

    III. Uppers

    1. General classification
    2. General effects
    3. Different uppers - cocaine, amphetamines, etc.

    IV. Downers: Opiates/Opioids and Sedatives - Hypnotics

    1. General classification
    2. Opiates/opioids
    3. Sedative-hypnotics
    4. Other problems with depressants

    V. Downers Alcohol

    1. Overview
    2. Absorption, distribution and metabolism
    3. Addiction
    4. Desired effects, side effects and health

    VI. All-Arounders

    1. History
    2. Classification
    3. General effects
    4. LSD, mushroom, MDMA, other psychedelics

    VII. Other drugs, other addictions

    1. Introduction
    2. Other drugs, inhalants, sport drugs
    3. Other addictions: compulsive gambling, compulsive shopping, internet addiction

    VIII. Drug Use and Prevention

    1. Introduction
    2. Prevention
    3. Concepts of prevention
    4. Prevention methods

    IX. Treatment

    1. Introduction
    2. Treatment effectiveness
    3. Treatment continuum
    4. Principles and goals of treatment
    5. Individual and group therapy
    6. Cultural /large populations
    7. Interventions

    X. Mental Health and Drugs        

    1. Introduction
    2. Dual diagnosis (co-occurring disorders)

    XI. Multicultural Contexts

    1. Impact
    2. Outcomes
    3. Treatment
    4. Stigmas

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. List the six levels of alcohol and drug use.
    2. Describe how addiction affects the central nervous system.
    3. Define Substance Related Disorder in accordance with the latest edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorder (DSM-V).
    4. Describe three signs and symptoms of addiction in behavioral, emotional and physical terms
    5. Outline the stages of attitudinal and behavioral change as described in motivational interviewing.
    6. Compare and contrast cultural issues related to addiction.
    7. Explain prevention methods of alcohol and drug use.
    8. Prepare for an intervention of an addicted person.
    9. Describe an intervention of an addicted person.
    10. Discuss two theories of addiction.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    ADCO 1030 - Pharmacology of Addiction Counseling

    Credits: 3
    Hours/Week: Lecture None Lab None
    Course Description: This course is an overview of the basics of pharmacology as applied to various classifications of mood-altering chemicals. It is also an examination of the central nervous system and drug/neurotransmitter interactions. The course examines substance-related disorders, detoxification, withdrawal, drug interaction, and dynamics of addiction. The course meets academic coursework criteria of Minnesota Statute 2005 Chapter 148c, Subdivision 5a, Area 2: “pharmacology of substance abuse disorders and the dynamics of addiction.”
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): ADCO 1020  with a grade of C or higher.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. How pharmacological drugs affect us

    1. The brain
    2. The nervous system
    3. Physiological response to drugs

    2. Basic pharmacology

    1. What is a drug
    2. Names of drugs
    3. Describing dosages
    4. Drug interaction
    5. Excretion, absorption, and metabolism

    3. Tolerance, withdrawal

    1. Tolerance
    2. Mechanism of tolerance
    3. Withdrawal symptoms and physical dependence

    4. Addiction process

    1. Neurophysiology, neurotransmitters and the nervous system
    2. The neuron
    3. The synapse
    4. Neurotransmitters
    5. The nervous system

    5. Brain imaging of drug effects

    6. Symptoms, how used, dependence, tolerance, withdrawal, drug interaction of:

    1. Cocaine
    2. Amphetamines
    3. Opioid /narcotics
    4. Benzodiazepine
    5. Barbiturates
    6. Hallucinogens
    7. Cannabis
    8. Psychotropic medication
    9. Alcohol

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. Identify the effects of alcohol and drugs on different parts of the brain.
    2. Explain addiction as related to the basics of pharmacology.
    3. Describe the neurotransmitters that are affected by alcohol and drugs.
    4. Recognize common drug interaction signs and withdrawal symptoms.
    5. Describe the metabolism and excretion processes of alcohol and drugs.
    6. Articulate how specific behavioral and physical signs and symptoms manifest themselves in the addiction process.
    7. Analyze the ethics of taking and using any drugs (methadone, Ritalin, over-the-counter drugs, etc.) as a challenge to one’s sobriety.
    8. Explain how various drugs interact when combined either legally or illegally.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    ADCO 1060 - Professional Conduct in Addiction Counseling

    Credits: 3
    Hours/Week: Lecture 3 Lab None
    Course Description: This course addresses the multicultural aspects of Substance Related Disorder, professional and ethical responsibilities, orientation, consultation, reporting and record keeping, referral, case management, and treatment planning. This course explores a model for ethical decision making in reference to Substance Related Disorder, including confidentiality, professional boundaries, and rules of conduct. The course includes a minimum of six hours of instruction in Addiction Counseling ethics as required by the Minnesota Board of Behavioral Health and Therapy, Minnesota Association of Resources for Recovery, and Chemical Health and National Association of Alcohol and Drug Abuse Counselors. This course meets academic coursework criteria of Minnesota Statute 2005 Chapter 148c, Subdivision 5a, Area 2 and Minnesota Rule 4747. Service learning is a component of this course.
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): ADCO 1020  with a grade of C or higher
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    I. Ethical and Legal Issues

    1. Review MN Chapter 2005 148c
    2. Review MN Rule4747
    3. Review ethical standards
      1. MARRCH
      2. MAADAC
      3. MN Certification Board
    4. Ethical decision making models
    5. Confidentiality
      1. HIPPA
      2. Federal and state laws
      3. Duty to warn
      4. Legal proceedings
    6. Boundaries of Chemical Dependency counselors

    II. Internship

    1. Finding and selecting a placement
    2. Portfolios, interview letters
    3. Making the most of your internship
    4. Supervision outline

    III. Working with Diversity

    1. Reasons for and resistance to diversity training
    2. Steps toward working with differences
    3. Knowing the diversity within us
    4. Confronting personal biases and ignorance
    5. Acknowledging prejudice and biases
    6. Multicultural aspects of chemical dependency; MN Rules 4747 and the ability to know when consultation is needed

    IV. Stress and Self Care

    1. Stress affecting helping professionals
    2. Signs of stress and burnout
    3. Self-care, physical and emotional

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. Discuss ethical behavior according to professional standards for the field.
    2. Analyze boundary issues in the addiction profession.
    3. Apply an ethical decision making model to an ethical dilemma.
    4. Identify personal approaches to cultural differences related to addiction.
    5. Describe confidentiality and legal issues relative to patients in chemical dependency treatment.
    6. Plan for an internship in the addiction field.
    7. Reflect on the service learning cultural diversity experience.
    8. Describe techniques for dealing with stress and strategies for self-care.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    ADCO 2010 - Addiction Counseling Assessment

    Credits: 3
    Hours/Week: Lecture None Lab None
    Course Description: This course addresses the screening, intake, assessment, treatment planning, and the multicultural aspects of Substance Related Disorders, case management, referral, record keeping, reports, consultation and professional conduct. Students focus on Substance Related Disorders assessment and criteria including the Six Dimensions of treatment planning according to 245G. This course meets the academic course work requirement for Minnesota Statute 2005 Chapter 148C and Minnesota Rule 4747.
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): ADCO 1020  with a grade of C or higher.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Assessment/screening

    1. Definitions
    2. Relapse prevention
    3. Assessment of the patient
    4. Assessment treatment special population
    5. Patient placement criteria

    2. Review and discuss Matrix

    1. History
    2. Review Matrix

    3. Treatment planning according to Statute 245G

    1. What is Statute 245G
    2. Overview Statute 245G
    3. ASAM Six Dimensions
    4. Severity risk scale
    5. Goals and methods
    6. Treatment planning
    7. Team meeting

    4. Assessment of addictive behavior in:

    1. Ethnic minority cultures
    2. Alcohol problems
    3. Cocaine abuse dependence
    4. Amphetamine use disorders
    5. Opioid use disorders
    6. Cannabis use disorders
    7. Club drugs, hallucinogens, inhalants and steroid use and misuse

    5. Case management for Substance Related Disorder

    1. Why case management
    2. Case management brief history
    3. Definition and function

    6. Reports, records and consultation

    1. Documentation
    2. Adherence to applicable laws, regulations, and agency policies in reference to client information
    3. Consultation with appropriate resources

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. Conduct an interview based on appropriate criteria for the field.
    2. Document an assessment summary from the interview.
    3. Conduct an interview using a variety of screening tools.
    4. Explain various assessment methods for addictive behavior in ethnic-minority cultures.
    5. Produce case examples in the six American Society of Alcohol Medicine (ASAM) dimension format.
    6. Devise a comprehensive assessment process that is sensitive to age, gender, racial and ethnic culture issues and disabilities.
    7. Outline case management activities.
    8. Formulate reports and relevant records integrating information to facilitate the continuum of care.
    9. Create a plan for effective treatment service in collaboration with other professionals.
    10. Document assessment findings and treatment recommendations.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    ADCO 2020 - Counseling Skills

    Credits: 3
    Hours/Week: Lecture 3 Lab None
    Course Description: This course addresses addiction counseling theory and practice, crisis intervention, orientation, client education, referral, professional and ethical responsibility, treatment planning, case management, reporting and record keeping, as well as culturally appropriate models for counseling. The course focuses on enhancing motivation for change in substance abuse treatment, stages of client change, and counseling skills appropriate for each particular stage. Students also address crisis intervention, grief and loss, and the 12 steps. This course meets the requirement for Minnesota Statute 2005 Chapter 148C and Minnesota Rule 4747.
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): ADCO 1020  with a grade of C or higher.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Six stages of counseling Information gathering Evaluation Feedback Counseling agreement Changing behavior Termination
    2. Review counseling theories
      1. Client Centered
      2. Motivational Interviewing
      3. CBT
    3. Conceptualizing motivation and change
      1. The stages of change
    4. Motivation and intervention
      1. Elements of effective motivational intervention
      2. Motivational interventions and stages of change
      3. Special application of motivational interventions
    5. Motivational interviewing as a counseling style
      1. Ambivalence
      2. Five principles of motivational interviewing
      3. Five opening strategies for early sessions
      4. Effectiveness of motivational interviewing
    6. From pre-contemplation to contemplation - building readiness
      1. Gentle strategies to use with the pre-contemplation
      2. Assessment and feedback process
    7. From contemplation to preparation: increasing commitment
      1. Changing extrinsic to intrinsic motivation
      2. Emphasizing personal choice and responsibility
    8. From preparation to action: getting started
      1. Recognizing readiness to move to action
      2. Negotiating a plan for action
      3. Initiating the plan
    9. From action to maintenance: stabilizing change
      1. Engaging and retaining clients in treatment
      2. Planning for stabilization
      3. Developing and using reinforcers
    10. Measuring/assessing components of client motivation
      1. Self efficacy
      2. Readiness to change
      3. Motivation for using substance
      4. Goals and values
    11. Integrating motivational approaches into treatment program
      1. Treatment continuum and stepped care
      2. Application of motivational approaches in specific treatment programs
    12. Crisis intervention
      1. History/definition of crisis
      2. Grief and loss
      3. Physical/mental abuse
    13. Professional conduct and ethics
      1. Confidentiality
      2. Ethical issues Rule 4747 and ethic code
    14. How to apply to multicultural and special populations

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. demonstrate basic listening and interview skills
    2. recognize and respond to grief issues
    3. encourage client engagement in the treatment and recovery process
    4. identify and resolve crisis situations with a client
    5. employ communication skills and strategies necessary to work effectively with other professionals in the field
    6. identify the six stages of counseling
    7. describe motivational interviewing and motivational interventions
    8. employ a variety of screening and assessment strategies related to motivational interviewing
    9. adapt counseling strategies to the individual characteristics of the client (including, but not limited to, disability, gender, sexual orientation, developmental level, culture, ethnicity, age, and health)
    10. demonstrate techniques and strategies for motivational interviewing as a counseling style

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    ADCO 2030 - Group Counseling

    Credits: 3
    Hours/Week: Lecture 3 Lab None
    Course Description: This course addresses Substance Related Disorder group counseling theory and practice, crisis intervention, orientation, client education, referral, and professional and ethical responsibility, treatment planning, reporting and record keeping, and case management. Culturally appropriate models for group counseling, formation of groups, ground rules and documentation in groups are addressed. This course meets the academic course work requirement for Minnesota Statute 2005 Chapter 148C and Minnesota Rule 4747.
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): ADCO 1020  with a grade of C or higher.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Introduction to Group work Overview of group counseling Types of groups Group counseling in a multicultural context Guidelines for serving multicultural populations
    2. Group Leadership Group leader as a person Group leadership skills Special skills for opening and closing group sessions Becoming diversity-competent group counselor
    3. Ethical and professional issues in group practice The rights of group participants/group rules Ethics of group leaders action/confidentiality Ethical issues in multicultural counseling Review professional conduct and ethics reference Minnesota Certification Board/MARRCH
    4. Early stages of groups Pre-group issues formation of the group Initial stage orientation and exploration Transition stage dealing with resistance
    5. Later Stages in the development of a group Working stage cohesion and productivity Final stage consolidation and termination Post group issues evaluation and follow-up
    6. How people change: the trans-theoretical model Overview of model Moving through the stage of change
    7. Strategies for facilitating change Motivational approach Principles of motivational interviewing Motivational strategies
    8. Putting it all together: setting up and carrying out intervention Suggested group size, frequency of sessions, session length Intake screening and assessment Session format Changes Pre-contemplation Contemplation Preparation Action Maintenance

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. Describe the major characteristics of each stage in the development of a group.
    2. Apply appropriate techniques to open and close a group session.
    3. Identify the major tasks of group leadership at each of the stages of a group.
    4. Work effectively with issues of culture diversity in a group.
    5. Employ specific skills that help members formulate personal goals in a group.
    6. Demonstrate appropriate skills to encourage group growth within established ground rules.
    7. Facilitate movement toward achievement of group and individual goals using methods consistent with the group type.
    8. Summarize client behavior within the group for the purpose of documenting a client’s progress.
    9. Analyze client needs and issues that may require a modification in the treatment plan.
    10. Recognize and resolve crises when they appear in groups.
    11. Employ motivational interviewing techniques to enhance change process.
    12. Apply appropriate motivational strategies in a variety of situations.
    13. Model appropriate ethical behavior.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    ADCO 2050 - Case Management for Addiction Counseling Treatment

    Credits: 3
    Hours/Week: Lecture 3 Lab None
    Course Description: This course provides an overview of the multiaxial assessment of the DSM-V.  Special problems, including mental health issues are discussed. The course provides students with knowledge and practice in case management, through screening, assessment, treatment planning, consulting, referral, and recordkeeping. The student will practice documentation of client problems, goals, objectives, and progress notes as required by treatment centers. This course meets the requirement for Minnesota Statute 2005 Chapter 148C and Minnesota Rule 4747.
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): ADCO 1020  with a grade of C or higher.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Diagostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (DSM)

    1. History of DSM and ICD
    2. Multiaxis
    3. Multiaxial assessment

    2. Bio-psychosocial interview

    1. How to conduct the interview
    2. Diagnosis
    3. Disposition and treatment plan

    3. The treatment plan

    1. How to build a treatment plan
    2. The problem list
    3. Goals and objectives
      1. How to develop goals
      2. How to develop interventions
      3. How to select goals, objectives, and interventions
    4. Documentation
      1. How to write progress notes
      2. The Six Dimensions

    4. Discharge summary and after-care plan

    1. How to develop a discharge summary and after-care plan
    2. Discharge summary and after-care plan in reference to the Six Dimensions

    5. Substance Related Disorders

    1. Outline presentation for Substance Related Disorders group
    2. Pick a topic
      1. Substance Related Disorders as a disease
      2. Defense mechanisms
      3. Physical addiction and recovery
      4. Alcoholic Anonymous
      5. Other topics

    6. Case management for substance abuse

    1. History and introduction
    2. Case management principles
    3. Culture issues

    7. Special problems

    1. The depressed client
    2. The angry client
    3. The homicidal client (duty to warn)
    4. Personality

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. Develop and document a treatment plan.
    2. Explain different ways to document progress notes using SOAP (Subjective Objective Assessment Plan), DAP (Data Assessment Plan), narrative and the Six Dimensions.
    3. Document an outline on a chemical dependency topic for presentation to a group.
    4. Demonstrate the principles of case management relative to substance abuse treatment.
    5. Formulate and document a complete written case study from the bio-psychosocial interview.
    6. Construct a discharge summary and after-care plan.
    7. Identify five elements that are culturally sensitive in case management.
    8. Identify various mental disorders, general medical conditions, psychosocial and environmental problems, and the level of functioning in the current five axes of the DSM.
    9. Demonstrate an understanding of the multiaxial classification of DSM 10. Assess the emotional states of the clients.
    10. Assess the emotional states of the clients.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    ADCO 2055 - Co-Occurring Disorders: Substance Abuse and Mental Health

    Credits: 1
    Hours/Week: Lecture 1 Lab None
    Course Description: This course meets the Statue 245G criteria for training in co-occurring mental health problems and substance abuse. The course includes competencies related to philosophy, screening, assessment, diagnosis and treatment planning, documentation, programming, medication, collaboration, mental health consultation, and discharge planning. The core functions involved include screening, intake, assessment, treatment planning, crisis intervention, referral and multicultural aspects of Substance Related Disorder.
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): ADCO 1020  with a grade of C or higher.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Introduction
      1. Overview of co-occurring disorders and substance abuse
      2. The evolving field of co-occuring disorders
    2. Definition, terms and classifications of items for co-occurring disorders and substance abuse
      1. Terms related to mental disorders
    3. Assessment
      1. Screening and basic assessment of co-occurring disorders
      2. The assessment process
    4. Strategies for working with clients with co-occurring disorders
      1. Guidelines for a successful therapeutic relationship with a client who has co-occurring disorders
      2. Technique for working with clients with co-occurring disorders
    5. Traditional setting and models
      1. Essential programming for clients with co-occurring disorders
    6. Special setting and specific programs
      1. Acute care and other medical centers
    7. A brief overview of specific mental disorders and cross cutting issues
      1. Personality disorders
      2. Mood disorders and anxiety disorders
      3. Schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders
      4. Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorders (AD/HD)
      5. Post-tramautic stress disorder (PTSD)
      6. Eating disorders
      7. Pathological gambling
    8. Substance abuse disorders
      1. Diagnostic considerations

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. explain the definitions, terms and classification system for co-occurring disorders.
    2. list common medications for co-occurring disorders.
    3. compare criteria in the DSM-V relating to substance abuse and co-occurring disorders.
    4. discuss case studies employing a variety of counseling strategies, i.e. cognitive behavior therapy, motivation interviewing techniques.
    5. describe appropriate counseling techniques in co-occurring disorders and substance abuse.
    6. contrast substance abuse and co-occurring disorders.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    ADCO 2781 - Addiction Counseling Internship I

    Credits: 4
    Hours/Week: Lecture 4 Lab None
    Course Description: This is the first internship course in a two-internship sequence. Students will work in a treatment facility to gain work experience integrating the 12 core addiction counseling functions defined by state law in their practicum. Internship I consists of 440 hours of the 880 required by state law. In addition to work experience, students will meet with faculty at assigned times to discuss their internship experiences.
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): All required addiction counseling coursework completed and instructor consent.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: Student should plan to complete ADCO 2781 and ADCO 2782  in two consecutive semesters.

    Major Content
    1. 12 core functions
    2. Ethical Behavior
    3. Issues of treatment centers
    4. Professional Role of the Counselor

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. work at a chemical dependency treatment facility under the supervision of a licensed alcohol and drug counselor for four hundred-forty (440) hours
    2. integrate theory and strategy from prior coursework to their work with clients in the clinical setting
    3. demonstrate competence in the 12 core functions.
    4. Screening which is defined as the process by which a client is determined appropriate and eligible for admission to a particular program. Intake which is defined as administrative and initial assessment procedures for admission to a program.
    5. Orientation which is defined as describing to the client the general nature and goals of the program; rules governing client conduct and infractions that can lead to disciplinary action or discharge from the program; in a nonresidential program, the hours during which services are available; treatment costs to be borne by the client, if any; and client’s rights. Assessment which is defined as those procedures by which a counselor identifies and evaluates an individuals strengths, weaknesses, problems, and needs to develop a treatment plan or make recommendations for level of care placemn
    6. Treatment planning which is defined as the process by which the counselor and the client identify and rank problems needing resolution; establish agreed upon immediate and long-term goals; and decide on a treatment process and the sources to be utilized. Counseling which is defined as the utilization of special skills to assist individuals, families, or groups in achieving objectives through exploration of a problem and its ramifications; examination of attitudes and feelings; consideration of alternative solutions; and decision making
    7. Case management which is defined as activities which bring services, agencies, resources, or people together within a planned framework of action toward the achievement of established goals. Crisis intervention which is defined as those services which respond to an alcohol or other drug users needs during acute emotional or physical distress
    8. Client education which is defined as the provision of information to clients who are receiving or seeking counseling concerning alcohol and other drug abuse and the available services and resources. Referral which is defined as identifying the needs of the client which cannot be met by the counselor or agency and assisting the client to utilize the support systems and available community resources
    9. Reports and record keeping which is defined as charting the results of the assessment and treatment plan, writing reports, progress notes, discharge summaries, and other client-related data. Consultation with other professionals regarding client treatment and services which is defined as communicating with other professionals in regard to client treatment and services to assure comprehensive, quality care for the client

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    ADCO 2782 - Addiction Counseling Internship II

    Credits: 4
    Hours/Week: Lecture None Lab None
    Course Description: This is the second internship course in a two-internship sequence. Students will work in a treatment facility to gain work experience integrating the 12 core addiction counseling functions defined by state law in their practicum. It consists of the remaining 440 hours of the 880 required by state law. In addition to work experience, students will meet with faculty at assigned times to discuss their internship experiences.
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): All required addiction counseling coursework completed and instructor consent.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: Student should complete ADCO 2781  and ADCO 2782 in two consecutive semesters.

    Major Content
    1. 12 core functions
    2. Ethical Behavior
    3. Issues of treatment centers
    4. Professional Role of the Counselor

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. work at a chemical dependency treatment facility under the supervision of a licensed alcohol and drug counselor for four hundred-forty (440) hours in order to complete the 880 hour internship required by state law
    2. integrate theory and strategy from prior coursework to their work with clients in the clinical setting.
    3. demonstrate competence in the 12 core functions.
    4. Screening which is defined as the process by which a client is determined appropriate and eligible for admission to a particular program.
      • Intake which is defined as administrative and initial assessment procedures for admission to a program
    5. Orientation which is defined as describing to the client the general nature and goals of the program; rules governing client conduct and infractions that can lead to disciplinary action or discharge from the program; in a nonresidential program, the hours during which services are available; treatment costs to be borne by the client, if any; and clients rights.
      • Assessment which is defined as those procedures by which a counselor identifies and evaluates an individuals strengths, weaknesses, problems, and needs to develop a treatment plan or make recommendations for level of care placeme
    6. Treatment planning which is defined as the process by which the counselor and the client identify and rank problems needing resolution; establish agreed upon immediate and long-term goals; and decide on a treatment process and the sources to be utilized. Counseling which is defined as the utilization of special skills to assist individuals, families, or groups in achieving objectives through exploration of a problem and its ramifications; examination of attitudes and feelings; consideration of alternative solutions; and decision making.
    7. Case management which is defined as activities which bring services, agencies, resources, or people together within a planned framework of action toward the achievement of established goals. Crisis intervention which is defined as those services which respond to an alcohol or other drug users needs during acute emotional or physical distress.
    8. Client education which is defined as the provision of information to clients who are receiving or seeking counseling concerning alcohol and other drug abuse and the available services and resources. Referral which is defined as identifying the needs of the client which cannot be met by the counselor or agency and assisting the client to utilize the support systems and available community resources
    9. Reports and record keeping which is defined as charting the results of the assessment and treatment plan, writing reports, progress notes, discharge summaries, and other client-related data. Consultation with other professionals regarding client treatment and services which is defined as communicating with other professionals in regard to client treatment and services to assure comprehensive, quality care for the client

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration


Additive and Digital Manufacturing

  
  •  

    ADM 1010 - Introduction to 3D Printing

    Credits: 3
    Hours/Week: Lecture 2 Lab 2
    Course Description: Additive Manufacturing, commonly referred to as 3D printing, is expanding rapidly into the world. This course introduces 3D printing technologies, including history, uses and challenges of 3D printers, and processes for designing, creating, and modifying 3D files. Topics include 3D scanning, the variety of CAD programs used, 3D printer maintenance and operation, and current uses of 3D printing across industry.
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Additive manufacturing technologies, background and history
    2. Current uses and applications in industry
    3. Solidworks, Fusion 360, and other CAD platforms
    4. 3D scanning and modification of organic files
    5. Material selection and applications
    6. 3D printer operation and maintenance

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course, students will be able to:

    1. explain history of 3D printing and different uses across industries.
    2. explain basic concepts of 3D printing, orientations, costs, strength.
    3. produce basic engineering CAD models.
    4. produce and modify organic/scanned CAD models.
    5. demonstrate basic 3D printer operation and maintenance.
    6. describe the seven technologies of 3D printing.
    7. assess material strength and suitability for applications.
    8. recommend most appropriate 3D printing technologies for applications.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    ADM 1060 - Medical Manufacturing

    Credits: 3
    Hours/Week: Lecture 3
    Course Description: This course enhances ADM and biology curriculum by emphasizing the procedures and topics frequently used in medical manufacturing environments. Topics include basic processes, workflow, quality control, compliance, Good Manufacturing and Good Laboratory Practices, and clean-room operations.
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1.  Medical manufacturing processes
    2.  Workflow and quality control
    3.  FDA approval process
    4.  Sterile technique and clean room operations
    5.  Documentation and standard operating procedures
    6.  Organizational structures and supply chain management

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course, students will be able to:

    1. describe basic medical manufacturing processes.
    2. analyze workflow and quality control aspects in a medical manufacturing setting.
    3. describe medical manufacturing compliance and standardization classifications.
    4. explain Good Manufacturing Practices and Good Laboratory Practices.
    5. follow clean room procedures and operations.
    6. explain manufacturing organizational structure and supply chain management.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    ADM 2010 - Additive Manufacturing Processes

    Credits: 3
    Hours/Week: Lecture 2 Lab 2
    Course Description: This course covers additive manufacturing processes involving 2D and 3D scanning and design, and processes used to create 3D objects. Emphasis will be placed on additive manufactured elements and systems utilizing contemporary CAD/CAM and additive (3D Printing) tools and methods.
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): Course placement into college-level English and Reading OR completion of ENGL 0950  with a grade of C or higher OR completion of RDNG 0940  with a grade of C or higher and qualifying English Placement Exam OR completion of RDNG 0950  with a grade of C or higher and ENGL 0090  with a grade of C or higher OR completion of ESOL 0051  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0052  with a grade of C or higher.  ECAD 1025  and ECAD 2053  with a grade of C or higher.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Course Introduction
    2. Introduction to 3D Printing
    3. 3D Build Parameters
    4. CAD File Types used in 3D Printing
    5. Closed Gear Systems
    6. Future of Additive Manufacturing
    7. 4D Printing
    8. 3D Printing Testing and Design
    9. Fluid Dynamics
    10. Parametric Design
    11. Post Processing
    12. Prototype Printing

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. apply 3D printing technology for time and cost savings.
    2. describe the advantages and limitations of each 3D printing technology.
    3. describe the economic implications of 3D printing including its impact on startup businesses and supply chains.
    4. evaluate real-life scenarios and recommend the appropriate use of 3D printing technology.
    5. explain current and emerging 3D printing applications in a variety of industries.
    6. explain key historical factors that have shaped manufacturing over the centuries.
    7. print objects containing moving parts without assembly.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    ADM 2020 - Robotics and Automated Systems Design

    Credits: 3
    Hours/Week: Lecture 2 Lab 2
    Course Description: This course provides a basic introduction to the field of robotics technology. Because of the multidisciplinary nature of robotics, the student is exposed to various facets of robotics including concepts from computer, electrical and mechanical disciplines with a focus on manufacturing processes. Content includes manipulators, drive systems, controllers, motion, payload, programming, and vision systems.
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): CSCI 1060  with a grade of C or higher.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Engineering design processes for robotic manufacturing systems
    2. Robotic systems for the “Factory of the Future”
    3. Programming methods used in robotics
    4. Automatous robotics
    5. Vison systems
    6. Computer aided design tools
    7. Technical documentation
    8. Internet of things link to manufacturing
    9. Programming, interfacing and integration of Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCS)
    10. Robotic installation
    11. Robotic mechanisms and sensors
    12. Tools and equipment
    13. Troubleshooting and repair of robotic components and systems

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. apply safe setup operations and procedures.
    2. describe new applications of robotics in manufacturing.
    3. develop computer generated machine paths using simulation and robotic application software.
    4. explain the history of robotic enhanced manufacturing.
    5. investigate limitations and advantages of types of robotic systems.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    ADM 2040 - Advanced Additive Concepts

    Credits: 3
    Hours/Week: Lecture 2 Lab 2
    Course Description: This course is focused on advanced concepts of additive manufacturing and the wide spread industry implementation of this disruptive technology.  Course content includes mechanical and physical properties of 3D printing materials, one-time use and end use products, blending additive with traditional manufacturing, and creating molds, jigs, and fixtures.  In this hands-on class, students will create, develop, and analyze additively manufactured products to meet the needs of diverse users. 
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): ADM 2010   with grade of C or higher.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Mechanical and physical material properties
    2. Polymers and metals
    3. Ceramics and composites
    4. Meeting customer needs and specifications
    5. One time use and end use parts
    6. Molds for traditional castings
    7. Jigs and fixtures

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course, students will be able to:

    1. describe and recommend additive manufacturing materials.
    2. suggest additive manufacturing processes to complement traditional manufacturing.
    3. identify the economics of additive systems.
    4. create tools, jigs, and fixtures using additive manufacturing.
    5. create molds for traditional manufacturing castings.
    6. identify uses where additive manufacturing can be implemented to replace or complement traditional manufacturing especially to address new or diverse situations.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    ADM 2050 - Lean Manufacturing

    Credits: 3
    Hours/Week: Lecture 3
    Course Description: This course introduces students to lean practices and principles used in manufacturing and other environments. Topics include how to tactically implement lean to drive improvements and measureable results, as well as apply principles, concepts, methods, and tools within a work cell, group, or value stream. This course prepares students to take the Tooling U-SME (Society of Manufacturing Engineers) lean bronze certificate exam.
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): Course placement into college-level English and Reading OR completion of ENGL 0950  with a grade of C or higher OR completion of RDNG 0940  with a grade of C or higher and qualifying English Placement Exam OR completion of RDNG 0950  with a grade of C or higher and ENGL 0090  with a grade of C or higher OR completion of ESOL 0051  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0052  with a grade of C or higher.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Cultural Enablers
    2. Continuous improvement
    3. Lean enterprise culture
    4. Measurement systems
    5. Principles of business results
    6. Key lean-related measures

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course, students will be able to:

    1. identify Cultural Enablers.
    2. implement process of continuous improvement.
    3. describe lean enterprise culture.
    4. measure business results.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    ADM 2060 - Bioprinting Processes

    Credits: 3
    Hours/Week: Lecture 2 Lab 2
    Course Description: This advanced course is intended to train students on the proper use, operation, and process of bioprinting. Primarily a hands-on lab environment, the course also includes lecture and other coursework. Topics include cell types, additives, slicing, and code writing for printer operation as well as successful pre- and post-processing techniques.
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 1010  or BIOL 1020  or BIOL 1041  and ADM 1010  or ADM 2010  with grades of C or higher.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Tissue engineering
    2. Bioprinting methods
    3. Cell types and additives
    4. Bioprinter use and operation
    5. Pre- and post-processing methods
    6. Printer software operation and code creation
    7. Preparing and developing 3D CAD files for printer use

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course, students will be able to:

    1. describe tissue engineering components.
    2. determine proper cell types and additives used in process.
    3. operate bioprinter.
    4. perform pre- and post-processing methods.
    5. create and modify code for prints.
    6. successfully produce 3D CAD files for printing.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    ADM 2080 - Enterprise System Integration Capstone

    Credits: 2
    Hours/Week: Lecture 1 Lab 2
    Course Description: This advanced course gives students the opportunity to apply the knowledge and skills needed to design and construct a working prototype. Students will design and construct prototypes using a variety of analog and digital manufacturing-related technologies in order to build a working basic computer-controlled machine.
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): ADM 2010  with a grade of C or higher.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Systems theory
    2. Project planning process and tools
    3. Machine design framework
    4. Machine mechanics and automation control
    5. Technical documentation
    6. CAD simulation tools
    7. 3D printing and prototyping
    8. Material characteristics
    9. Machine testing and evaluation
    10. Prototyping 3D methods
    11. Quality control

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. apply the principles of systems theory in order to construct a working machine based on a perceived need.
    2. construct computer generated prototype models.
    3. construct evaluation benchmark tests.
    4. demonstrate project management methods.
    5. develop a project charter.
    6. develop computer generated simulation models.
    7. develop computer programs to control machine components.
    8. develop skills necessary to work in a diverse team.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    ADM 2780 - Internship in ADM

    Credits: 1-6
    Hours/Week: Lecture None Lab None
    Course Description: This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to apply knowledge and skills learned in the Additive and Digital Manufacturing program in an actual job environment. The internship is intended to provide students with on-the-job education and training experience in preparation for employment.
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): Instructor Consent
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Employment resume and cover letter
    2. Weekly internship log/quick reports
    3. LinkedIn profile
    4. Professional presentation summarizing internship experience linked to formal academic course work
    5. Criteria performance feedback/appraisal

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. construct a professional resume.
    2. create an organizational chart.
    3. demonstrate employment interview skills.
    4. design and deliver a professional presentation outlining the internship experience.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration


American Sign Language

  
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    ASL 1011 - American Sign Language I

    Credits: 4
    Hours/Week: Lecture 4 Lab None
    Course Description: This course focuses on American Sign Language (ASL) grammatical structures, non-manual behaviors, vocabulary and classifiers, fingerspelling and numbers, communication skills (conversations and discussions), and other language functions. Coursework activities include describing others, making requests, discussing family and occupations, attributing qualities to other people, and talking about daily routines and weekend activities. Supporting activities include attendance at Deaf events, film and video viewing, ASL literary readings, and other analytical activities.
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): Course placement into college-level English and Reading OR completion of ENGL 0950  with a grade of C or higher OR completion of RDNG 0940  with a grade of C or higher and qualifying English Placement Exam OR completion of RDNG 0950  with a grade of C or higher and ENGL 0090  with a grade of C or higher OR completion of ESOL 0051  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0052  with a grade of C or higher.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Discussing Living Situations
    2. Exchanging Personal Information
    3. Introducing Oneself
    4. Receptive/Expressive Fingerspelling/Numbers
    5. Storytelling
    6. Talking about Activities
    7. Talking about Family
    8. Deaf Culture
      1. Introduction to Deaf Community Video
      2. Deaf Community Social Function Experience
    9. Linguistic Differences between ASL and English
    10. Vocabulary

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. demonstrate initial knowledge of content-specific commands, questions, and statements in American Sign Language (ASL).
    2. show knowledge of vocabulary.
    3. demonstrate comprehension and conversation facilitating behaviors.
    4. demonstrate comprehension and production of regulating behaviors (i.e. attention getting techniques, turn taking signals, and others).
    5. demonstrate comprehension of short narratives and stories in ASL.
    6. describe the connection between ASL and Deaf Culture.
    7. demonstrate awareness about the use of technology to access and exchange information with and within the Deaf community.
    8. recognize differences and similarities between spoken languages and the visual/conceptual structure of ASL.
    9. sign and comprehend short dialogues/complete short sentences in ASL.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
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    ASL 1012 - American Sign Language II

    Credits: 4
    Hours/Week: Lecture 4 Lab None
    Course Description: This course, a continuation of ASL I, covers skill progression in ASL grammatical structures, non-manual behaviors, vocabulary and classifiers, fingerspelling and numbers, communication skills (conversations and discussions), and other language functions. Coursework includes applying skills learned in ASL I and practicing increasingly complex sign-language activities. Supporting activities include attendance at Deaf events, film and video viewing, ASL literary readings, and other analytical activities.
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): ASL 1011  with a grade C or higher or instructor consent.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. An Introduction to Deaf Community Video
    2. Deaf Community Social Function Experience
    3. Describe Others
    4. Dialogue Practices
    5. Family and Relationship
    6. Give Directions
    7. Make Requests
    8. Storytelling
    9. Talk About Family & Occupations

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. demonstrate additional comprehension and conversation facilitating behaviors.
    2. recognize differences and similarities between spoken languages and the visual/conceptual structure of ASL.
    3. demonstrate comprehension of increasingly complex narratives and stories in ASL.
    4. demonstrate progression of knowledge of content-specific commands, questions, and statements in American Sign Language (ASL), both non-manual behaviors and manual signs.
    5. show continued knowledge of vocabulary.
    6. demonstrate increased comprehension and production of regulating behaviors (i.e. attention getting techniques, turn taking signals, and others).
    7. sign and comprehend increasingly complex dialogues/sentences in ASL.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration


Anthropology

  
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    ANTH 1022 - Introduction to Physical Anthropology: Human Origins

    Credits: 3
    Hours/Week: Lecture 3 Lab None
    Course Description: This course is an introduction to physical anthropology through the study of human origins. This includes a detailed introduction to evolutionary theory and related topics, such as Mendelian and population genetics, taxonomy, and primate behavior and ecology. Central to the course is the human and non-human primate fossil evidence, and the evolutionary origins of modern Homo sapiens. Students will attend lectures, have assigned readings, and do hands-on work with fossil replicas during the semester. This course is intended for new students in anthropology.
    MnTC Goals
    3 Natural Science, 10 People/Environment

    Prerequisite(s): Course placement into college-level English and Reading OR completion of ENGL 0950  with a grade of C or higher OR completion of RDNG 0940  with a grade of C or higher and qualifying English Placement Exam OR completion of RDNG 0950  with a grade of C or higher and ENGL 0090  with a grade of C or higher OR completion of ESOL 0051  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0052  with a grade of C or higher.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Introduction to anthropology.
    2. Mendelian and population genetics.
    3. The evolution of evolutionary theory.
    4. The primate order.
    5. Primate ecology and behavior.
    6. Primate evolution.
    7. The human fossil record.
    8. Human behavior and ecology.
    9. The evolution of modern humans.
    10. The evolution of human behavior.
    11. Hands-on fossil analysis

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. explain evolutionary theory.
    2. demonstrate a scientific understanding of primate behavior and ecology.
    3. demonstrate their understanding of the theoretical advancements of neodarwinism.
    4. explain the fossil record of primates and humans.
    5. apply critical thinking skills to the claims of anti-evolutionists.
    6. explain the facts of human evolution.
    7. perform fossil identification through lab-like class exercises.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    03. 01. Demonstrate understanding of scientific theories.
    03. 03. Communicate their experimental findings, analyses, and interpretations both orally and in writing.
    03. 04. Evaluate societal issues from a natural science perspective, ask questions about the evidence presented, and make informed judgments about science-related topics and policies.
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    10. 01. Explain the basic structure and function of various natural ecosystems and of human adaptive strategies within those systems.
    10. 02. Discern patterns and interrelationships of bio-physical and socio-cultural systems.
    10. 04. Evaluate critically environmental and natural resource issues in light of understandings about interrelationships, ecosystems, and institutions.
    10. 06. Articulate and defend the actions they would take on various environmental issues.


    Courses and Registration

  
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    ANTH 1023 - Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

    Credits: 3
    Hours/Week: Lecture 3 Lab None
    Course Description: This course examines the fundamental social processes that universally bind humans together and tear them apart: subsistence, language, kinship, reproduction, alliances, food production, economics, competition, warfare and death. The anthropological approach to these topics is to study human societies from around the world using the guiding concepts of culture and evolution.
    MnTC Goals
    5 History/Social/Behavioral Science, 8 Global Perspective

    Prerequisite(s): Course placement into college-level English and Reading OR completion of ENGL 0950  with a grade of C or higher OR completion of RDNG 0940  with a grade of C or higher and qualifying English Placement Exam OR completion of RDNG 0950  with a grade of C or higher and ENGL 0090  with a grade of C or higher OR completion of ESOL 0051  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0052  with a grade of C or higher.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Introduction to Anthropology
    2. Human Origins and Evolutionary Theory
    3. Culture as Socially Transmitted Information
    4. The Individual and Society
    5. The History of Anthropology
    6. Anthropological Theory
    7. Patterns of Subsistence
    8. Language
    9. Kinship
    10. Sex, Gender, Marriage, and the Division of Labor
    11. Alliances, Competition, and Warfare
    12. Cultural Contact

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. explain the anthropological concept of culture.
    2. articulate their understanding of cultural evolution.
    3. evaluate the effects of the developed world on indigenous populations.
    4. describe patterns of human subsistence.
    5. critically evaluate racist claims about human variation.
    6. assess the empirical strength of various anthropological theories.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    05. 01. Employ the methods and data that historians and social and behavioral scientists use to investigate the human condition.
    05. 02. Examine social institutions and processes across a range of historical periods and cultures.
    05. 03. Use and critique alternative explanatory systems or theories.
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    08. 01. Describe and analyze political, economic, and cultural elements which influence relations of states and societies in their historical and contemporary dimensions.
    08. 02. Demonstrate knowledge of cultural, social, religious and linguistic differences.
    08. 03. Analyze specific international problems, illustrating the cultural, economic, and political differences that affect their solution.


    Courses and Registration

  
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    ANTH 2031 - Sex and Gender

    Credits: 3
    Hours/Week: Lecture 3 Lab None
    Course Description: This course will examine sex and gender from an anthropological perspective. Anthropology recognizes that human behavior and social systems arise as a result of the interaction of our biology and our environment. This class will begin by studying sex from an evolutionary perspective. Later, the class will turn to the topic of gender, which is the behavior associated with each sex as defined varyingly by different cultures. Students will study gender across many different cultures around the world and look for patterns to seek a better understanding of our species and ourselves.
    MnTC Goals
    5 History/Social/Behavioral Science, 8 Global Perspective

    Prerequisite(s): Course placement into college-level English and Reading OR completion of ENGL 0950  with a grade of C or higher OR completion of RDNG 0940  with a grade of C or higher and qualifying English Placement Exam OR completion of RDNG 0950  with a grade of C or higher and ENGL 0090  with a grade of C or higher OR completion of ESOL 0051  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0052  with a grade of C or higher.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: ANTH 1021 or ANTH 1022  with a grade of C or higher.

    Major Content
    1. introduction to anthropology
    2. methods and theories
    3. the evolution of sexual reproduction
    4. human sex and mate choice
    5. gender
    6. cross-cultural data
    7. contemporary issues of sex and gender
    8. social science writing instruction

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. explain various anthropological methods for collecting data.
    2. analyze anthropological theories to explain human behavior.
    3. demonstrate familiarity with studies regarding the evolution of human sexuality.
    4. describe the anthropological concept of gender.
    5. construct an argumentative social science paper.
    6. explain the cross-cultural patterns of uniformity and diversity in various aspects of

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    05. 01. Employ the methods and data that historians and social and behavioral scientists use to investigate the human condition.
    05. 02. Examine social institutions and processes across a range of historical periods and cultures.
    05. 03. Use and critique alternative explanatory systems or theories.
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    08. 02. Demonstrate knowledge of cultural, social, religious and linguistic differences.
    08. 03. Analyze specific international problems, illustrating the cultural, economic, and political differences that affect their solution.
    08. 04. Understand the role of a world citizen and the responsibility world citizens share for their common global future.


    Courses and Registration

  
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    ANTH 2061 - Anthropology of Human Nature

    Credits: 3
    Hours/Week: Lecture 3 Lab None
    Course Description: This class introduces the broad anthropological study of behavior from a Darwinian perspective. Students explore the evidence concerning the evolution of primate behavior and the past several million years of human evolution with a strong emphasis on the behavior of our ancestors. Initial topics include a detailed introduction to natural selection and a brief survey of human evolution. This is followed by readings and lectures on the evolution of primate and human tool use, diet, food-sharing, cooperation, mate selection, sex, child-rearing, and conflict. Finally, the course explores cross-cultural patterns in modern human behavior.
    MnTC Goals
    5 History/Social/Behavioral Science, 10 People/Environment

    Prerequisite(s): Course placement into college-level English and Reading OR completion of ENGL 0950  with a grade of C or higher OR completion of RDNG 0940  with a grade of C or higher and qualifying English Placement Exam OR completion of RDNG 0950  with a grade of C or higher and ENGL 0090  with a grade of C or higher OR completion of ESOL 0051  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0052  with a grade of C or higher.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: ANTH 1021 or ANTH 1022  with a grade of C or higher.

    Major Content
    1. Introduction to Anthropology
    2. Human evolution
    3. Primate behavior
    4. The evolution of human behavior
    5. The evolution of human parenting
    6. Human universals
    7. Human evolutionary psychology
    8. Human conflict
    9. Social science writing instruction
    10. The history of evolutionary thought

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. analyze the basic principles of natural selection.
    2. construct an argumentative paper built around an evolutionary thesis.
    3. evaluate claims concerning the nature/nurture debate regarding human behavior.
    4. analyze the data on universal patterns of modern human behavior.
    5. explain the evolution of human behavior.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    05. 01. Employ the methods and data that historians and social and behavioral scientists use to investigate the human condition.
    05. 02. Examine social institutions and processes across a range of historical periods and cultures.
    05. 03. Use and critique alternative explanatory systems or theories.
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    10. 01. Explain the basic structure and function of various natural ecosystems and of human adaptive strategies within those systems.
    10. 02. Discern patterns and interrelationships of bio-physical and socio-cultural systems.
    10. 03. Describe the basic institutional arrangements (social, legal, political, economic, religious) that are evolving to deal with environmental and natural resource challenges.


    Courses and Registration


Art

  
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    ART 1020 - Art Appreciation

    Credits: 3
    Hours/Week: Lecture 3 Lab None
    Course Description: This course introduces students to art from a variety of cultures and historical contexts. Topics include major art movements, varieties of materials, and aesthetic theories. Coursework covers formal terms, elements, and principles common to the study of art and architecture.
    MnTC Goals
    6 Humanities/Fine Arts, 8 Global Perspective

    Prerequisite(s): Course placement into college-level English and Reading OR completion of ENGL 0950  with a grade of C or higher OR completion of RDNG 0940  with a grade of C or higher and qualifying English Placement Exam OR completion of RDNG 0950  with a grade of C or higher and ENGL 0090  with a grade of C or higher OR completion of ESOL 0051  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0052  with a grade of C or higher.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Elements of art
    2. Principles of Design
    3. Materials and media (technical aspects)
    4. The creative process/seeing and responding
    5. The evolution of art
    6. Purposes of art
    7. Subject, form, and content
    8. Defining art
    9. Abstraction, Representation, and Non-representational art
    10. Aesthetic theories
    11. Architecture
    12. Art vs. craft (non-functional vs. functional design)
    13. Socio-political influences on art and architecture throughout history
    14. Form and function
    15. Major styles and movements from around the world
    16. Art and religion (influence of religious beliefs on the function of art)
    17. Universal relationships and themes
    18. Art and Science (impact of technological inventions on art and art materials throughout history.

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. Analyze the ways in which art reflects cultural values
    2. Identify major socio-political events that have impacted art
    3. Analyze the form and content of art/architecture using terms and principles common to art.
    4. Identify major art movements, works of art, and architecture.
    5. Describe technical methods and materials used for making art/architecture.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    06. 01. Demonstrate awareness of the scope and variety of works in the arts and humanities.
    06. 02. Understand those works as expressions of individual and human values within an historical and social context.
    06. 03. Respond critically to works in the arts and humanities.
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    08. 01. Describe and analyze political, economic, and cultural elements which influence relations of states and societies in their historical and contemporary dimensions.
    08. 02. Demonstrate knowledge of cultural, social, religious and linguistic differences.
    08. 03. Analyze specific international problems, illustrating the cultural, economic, and political differences that affect their solution.


    Courses and Registration

  
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    ART 1021 - Art History of the Western World I

    Credits: 3
    Hours/Week: Lecture 3 Lab None
    Course Description: This course traces the development of art and architecture in the west from the Paleolithic through the Gothic Periods - the art, architecture, philosophies, and traditions that continue to shape the modern western world. Students examine individual historical styles, techniques and ideological movements that have evolved in western art making, architecture and design.
    MnTC Goals
    6 Humanities/Fine Arts, 8 Global Perspective

    Prerequisite(s): Course placement into college-level English and Reading OR completion of ENGL 0950  with a grade of C or higher OR completion of RDNG 0940  with a grade of C or higher and qualifying English Placement Exam OR completion of RDNG 0950  with a grade of C or higher and ENGL 0090  with a grade of C or higher OR completion of ESOL 0051  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0052  with a grade of C or higher.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. What is the study of Art History?
    2. Visual analysis of an image: Actively Seeing
    3. Vocabulary common to Art and Design
    4. Early Art: Paleolithic, Mesolithic and Neolithic Art, approx. 30,000-2,000 BCE The Art of Mesopotamia, approx. 3,500 BCE- 636 CE The Art of Ancient Egypt, approx. 3,000 BCE- 30 BCE The Art of the Prehistoric Aegean, approx. 3,000 BCE- 1200 BCE The Art of Ancient Greece, approx. 900 BCE-31 BCE The Art of the Etruscans, approx. 900 BCE-89 BCE The Art of Ancient Rome, approx. 753 BCE-337 CE The Art of Late Antiquity: The decline of Rome, approx. 29 CE-526CE The Art of Byzantium: Eastern Roman Empire, approx. 527 CE-1453 CE The Art of the Islamic World, approx. 600 CE-1600CE
    5. Early Medieval Art in the West, approx. 476 CE-1050CE Romanesque Art, approx. 1000 CE-1200CE Gothic Europe, approx. 1140 CE-1400CE Instructor may include other cultures of influence within these time periods if appropriate
    6. Romanesque Art, approx. 1000 CE-1200CE
    7. Gothic Europe, approx. 1140 CE-1400CE

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. Trace the development of human art making, architecture and design from pre-history to the Gothic periods
    2. Recognize the cultural patterns of cause and effect as seen in stylistic changes in artwork
    3. Identify early civilizations using stylistic details, iconography, and unique artistic forms
    4. Identify cultures and societies through careful analysis of works of art, archeological artifacts, architecture, iconography, and visual language
    5. Use art and design vocabulary to describe works of art
    6. Compare and contrast architectural styles throughout history
    7. Compare and contrast artistic styles across cultures and throughout history
    8. Identify works of art and their influences

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    06. 01. Demonstrate awareness of the scope and variety of works in the arts and humanities.
    06. 02. Understand those works as expressions of individual and human values within an historical and social context.
    06. 03. Respond critically to works in the arts and humanities.
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    08. 01. Describe and analyze political, economic, and cultural elements which influence relations of states and societies in their historical and contemporary dimensions.
    08. 02. Demonstrate knowledge of cultural, social, religious and linguistic differences.
    08. 03. Analyze specific international problems, illustrating the cultural, economic, and political differences that affect their solution.


    Courses and Registration

  
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    ART 1022 - Art History of the Western World II

    Credits: 3
    Hours/Week: Lecture 3 Lab None
    Course Description: This course traces the development of Art in the West from the Renaissance Period through the 20th Century - the art, architecture, philosophies, and traditions that continue to shape the modern western world. Students examine individual historical styles, techniques and ideological movements that have evolved in western art making, architecture and design.
    MnTC Goals
    6 Humanities/Fine Arts, 8 Global Perspective

    Prerequisite(s): Course placement into college-level English and Reading OR completion of ENGL 0950  with a grade of C or higher OR completion of RDNG 0940  with a grade of C or higher and qualifying English Placement Exam OR completion of RDNG 0950  with a grade of C or higher and ENGL 0090  with a grade of C or higher OR completion of ESOL 0051  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0052  with a grade of C or higher.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. What is the study of Art History?
    2. Vocabulary common to Art and Design
    3. Visual analysis of an image: Actively Seeing
    4. Transition from Gothic: 14th C. Italian Art, approx. 1200CE-1400CE
    5. Northern Renaissance: 15th C. Art in Northern Europe and Spain, approx. 1375CE-1500CE
    6. Italian Renaissance: 15th C. Italian Art, approx. 1420CE-1500CE
    7. The High Renaissance and Mannerism, approx. 1500CE-1600CE
    8. Reformation: 16th C. Art in Northern Europe and Spain, approx. 1475CE-1600CE
    9. Baroque Art, approx. 1600CE-1750CE
    10. Enlightenment: Art of the Late 18th through Mid. 19thC, approx. 1750CE-1851CE
    11. Modernism: Art of the Later 19th Century, approx. 1850CE-1905CE
    12. Modernist Art: The Early 20th Century, approx. 1900CE-1940CE 13. Modern to Postmodern: Art of the Later 20thC. 1945CE-2000CE

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. Trace the development of human art making, architecture and design from the Renaissance Period to the 20th Century
    2. Compare and contrast architectural styles throughout history
    3. Compare and contrast artistic styles across cultures and throughout history
    4. Identify works of art and their influences
    5. Recognize the cultural patterns of cause and effect as seen in stylistic changes in artwork
    6. Recognize stylistic details, iconography, and unique artistic forms as coming from specific historical time periods and cultures
    7. Identify cultures and societies through careful analysis of works of art, archeological artifacts, architecture, iconography, and visual language
    8. Use art and design vocabulary to describe works of art

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    06. 01. Demonstrate awareness of the scope and variety of works in the arts and humanities.
    06. 02. Understand those works as expressions of individual and human values within an historical and social context.
    06. 03. Respond critically to works in the arts and humanities. 06. 05. Articulate an informed personal reaction to works in the arts and humanities.
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    08. 01. Describe and analyze political, economic, and cultural elements which influence relations of states and societies in their historical and contemporary dimensions.
    08. 02. Demonstrate knowledge of cultural, social, religious and linguistic differences.
    08. 03. Analyze specific international problems, illustrating the cultural, economic, and political differences that affect their solution.


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    ART 1024 - 2D Design

    Credits: 3
    Hours/Week: Lecture 2 Lab 2
    Course Description: This course is a foundation level study of the development, principles, and elements of two-dimensional design. Students will explore the concepts of composition through guided projects and demonstrations, discovering a working creative process, an awareness of design in our culture, and awareness of current design issues. Students will experience both traditional and digital studio practices.
    MnTC Goals
    6 Humanities/Fine Arts

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. What is 2D design?
    2. Historical Overview
    3. Visual Elements:
      1. Line
      2. Shape
      3. Texture
      4. Value
      5. Time and Motion
    4. Design Principles:
      1. Gestalt
      2. Unity and Variety
      3. Balance
      4. Scale and Proportion
      5. Repetition and Rhythm
      6. Emphasis
      7. Spatial Devices
      8. Directional Forces
      9. Determining Priorities
    5. Two-Dimensional Materials and Methods
    6. Concepts and Critical Thinking Cultivating Creativity, Creative Process Developing Critical Thinking Problem Seeking and Solving, Sketch Process Meaning: Subject, Form, and Content, Visual Metaphor Critique
    7. Introduction to Digital Design Programs and Processes
      1. Adobe Illustrator
      2. Adobe Photoshop
      3. Or equivalent
    8. Introduction to Color
      1. theory
      2. Defining Color
      3. Color theory
      4. Color Physics
      5. Color Schemes
      6. Color Composition and
      7. Meaning

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. apply the terms and concepts common to two-dimensional design.
    2. identify the elements of two-dimensional design in various works of art and in a variety of media.
    3. evaluate a work of art using the basic principles of two-dimensional design.
    4. create two-dimensional compositions using the principles and elements of two-dimensional design.
    5. develop effective solutions to two-dimensional design problems using research, process sketches, and idea generation.
    6. develop effective solutions to two-dimensional design problems using the basic tools found in computer-aided design programs.
    7. use the principles of color theory in two-dimensional projects.
    8. explain the cultural/social/historical contexts that influence two-dimensional design and the arts.
    9. develop individual creative process, idea generation, and personal expression.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    06. 01. Demonstrate awareness of the scope and variety of works in the arts and humanities.
    06. 02. Understand those works as expressions of individual and human values within an historical and social context.
    06. 03. Respond critically to works in the arts and humanities.
    06. 04. Engage in the creative process or interpretive performance.
    06. 05. Articulate an informed personal reaction to works in the arts and humanities.


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    ART 1025 - 3D Design

    Credits: 3
    Hours/Week: Lecture 2 Lab 2
    Course Description: This course is a foundation level study of the principles and elements of three-dimensional design. Students use a variety of media and art techniques to explore three-dimensional design; form, line, plane, volume, mass, space, texture, light, and time. Projects emphasize a working creative method for problem solving in three-dimensions as well as a general knowledge of historical and contemporary design issues.
    MnTC Goals
    6 Humanities/Fine Arts

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. What is 3D design?
    2. Historical Overview
    3. Visual Elements: Form Line Plane Volume Mass Space Texture Light Time
    4. Design Principles: Gestalt Unity and Variety Balance Scale and Proportion Repetition and Rhythm Emphasis
    5. Three Dimensional Materials and Methods: Choice of materials Connections and transitions Materials and Meanings
    6. Introduction to Color theory Defining Color Color theory Color Physics Color Schemes Color Composition and Meaning
    7. Concepts and Critical Thinking Cultivating Creativity, Creative Process Developing Critical Thinking Problem Seeking and Solving, Sketch Process Meaning: Subject, Form, and Content Critique

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. Create three dimensional projects using the principles and elements of three-dimensional design
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the terms and concepts common to three-dimensional design and sculpture
    3. Evaluate a three-dimensional work of art using the basic principles of three-dimensional design
    4. Identify the elements of three-dimensional design in various works of art and in a variety of media
    5. Develop effective solutions to three-dimensional design assignment problems using research, process sketches and idea generation
    6. Recognize the principles of color theory
    7. Apply the principles of color theory to three-dimensional projects
    8. Demonstrate verbally and through writing, an understanding of the cultural/social/historical context that influence three-dimensional design and the arts
    9. Develop individual creative process, idea generation and personal expression through guided exercises and assignments

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    06. 01. Demonstrate awareness of the scope and variety of works in the arts and humanities.
    06. 02. Understand those works as expressions of individual and human values within an historical and social context.
    06. 03. Respond critically to works in the arts and humanities.
    06. 04. Engage in the creative process or interpretive performance.
    06. 05. Articulate an informed personal reaction to works in the arts and humanities.


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    ART 1031 - Photography 1

    Credits: 3
    Hours/Week: Lecture 3 Lab None
    Course Description: This course is designed as an exploration of photography as a means of visual communication and creative expression. Students are introduced to the basics of 35 mm cameras and black and white darkroom practices. Projects address a range of design, aesthetic, and conceptual issues fundamental to the art of photography. Strong emphasis is on the development of both a technical foundation and a critical awareness of the medium as a creative tool. This course requires 2 additional lab hours per week.
    MnTC Goals
    6 Humanities/Fine Arts

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: ART 1024  

    Major Content
    1. Introduction to Photography as a creative tool Formal elements specific to the medium of photography Portrait- interpretive and descriptive Landscape- ethically evaluative and aesthetically evaluative Final Projects- proposals and artist statements
    2. Technical Basics Introduction to the 35mm SLR Camera Film Developing and printing Introduction to digital photography Finishing and presentation
    3. Contemporary Issues/criticism Art Photography and photography in Art (traditional vs. contemporary) Visual literacy Controversy in art and media Reading and discussion What is criticism Writing Assignment Describe a photograph Subject matter and subject Types of photographs Critique

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. Create images utilizing photographic processes.
    2. Demonstrate effective solutions to creative assignments applying knowledge of the materials, research of contemporary issues in art making and creative problem solving skills.
    3. Apply a basic understanding of technical elements of photography, such as film exposure and development, black and white printing, and methods of presentation.
    4. Demonstrate an ability to critique artworks, utilizing terms common to art.
    5. Articulate (verbally and through writing) an understanding of formal and theoretical concepts within art, specifically within the area of photography.
    6. Demonstrate an understanding of craftsmanship and presentation methods in their creative work.
    7. Identify various exemplary works of contemporary art as well as works of historical significance.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    06. 01. Demonstrate awareness of the scope and variety of works in the arts and humanities.
    06. 02. Understand those works as expressions of individual and human values within an historical and social context.
    06. 03. Respond critically to works in the arts and humanities.
    06. 04. Engage in the creative process or interpretive performance.
    06. 05. Articulate an informed personal reaction to works in the arts and humanities.


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    ART 1041 - Drawing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours/Week: Lecture 2 Lab 2
    Course Description: This course introduces students to fundamental drawing strategies. Projects emphasize direct observation of nature, still life, and the human form. Assignments are designed to improve drawing skills, engage creative problem-solving, as well as broaden students’ knowledge of the cultural/historical relevance of drawing.
    MnTC Goals
    6 Humanities/Fine Arts

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Historical/Cultural Overview Origins and evolution of drawing as a form of human communication Cultural context Traditional and contemporary applications
    2. Materials Technical aspects and applications of common materials
    3. Introduction to the elements of art: Line: Types, qualities and functions Shape: Types, qualities and functions Value: Applications and functions (form, depth, mood, and atmosphere) Texture: Types, qualities and functions Form: Integrating and defining the range of applications Space: Spatial devices Color: (This course does not require a unit on color) Optional unit on color theory basics and how to use color drawing materials.
    4. Introduction to principles of composition Design terms and concepts Picture plane dynamics and construction Impact of format and cropping
    5. Themes Process vs. product Introspective observation/Heighteningvisual perception Objectivity vs. subjectivity Abstraction vs. representation Form, subject and content
    6. Processes Preliminary construction strategies Sketching Seeing and responding Creative thinking strategies (convergent and divergent) Analyzing complex/simple forms and spatial relationships through direct observation of nature, still life and the human form.

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. Apply art elements toward an aesthetic and/or technical goal.
    2. Apply composition principles toward an aesthetic and/or technical goal.
    3. Analyze visual relationships observed in nature, still life, and the human form via drawing.
    4. Apply fundamental drawing strategies for constructing the illusion of dimensional space and form.
    5. Visually communicate ideas and perceptions using traditional and contemporary drawing processes.
    6. Analyze drawings using terms, principles, and criteria common to art.
    7. Analyze the historical/cultural relevance of drawing and its many applications.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    06. 01. Demonstrate awareness of the scope and variety of works in the arts and humanities.
    06. 02. Understand those works as expressions of individual and human values within an historical and social context.
    06. 03. Respond critically to works in the arts and humanities.
    06. 04. Engage in the creative process or interpretive performance.
    06. 05. Articulate an informed personal reaction to works in the arts and humanities.


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    ART 1051 - Painting 1

    Credits: 3
    Hours/Week: Lecture 2 Lab 2
    Course Description: This course provides an introduction to the fundamentals of painting principles, methods, materials, and critique. Students work from observation, simultaneously strengthening perceptual abilities increasing knowledge and use of acrylic paint. Painting assignments are supported by readings, discussions and research of historic, cultural and contemporary painting issues.
    MnTC Goals
    6 Humanities/Fine Arts

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: ART 1024 , ART 1041  

    Major Content
    1. Introduction to Materials Paint: Types Substrates: canvas, paper, board Brushes: Types and purpose
    2. Sketchbook/Creative Problem Solving Idea generation Creative problem solving
    3. Cultural/Historical Overview Western traditions/historical context What is a painting? Cultural implications of formal modes and elements ntroduction to painting beyond western traditions
    4. Color Application Approaches to color in painting Choosing a color palette/color key Color balance and harmony Luminosity
    5. Composition and Picture Plane Introduction to Gestalt theory Compositional movement Establishing visual rhythm
    6. Content Creating meaning through visual metaphor Subject matter
    7. Form Modes or types of representation Modeling form from observation Basics of light and shadow
    8. Introduction to Color Introduction to color theory Color vocabulary Color and perception
    9. Shape, Volume and Gesture ainting from observation Planes, volumes and objects Dynamic brushstrokes Gesture and meaning
    10. Spatial Conventions Introduction to spatial illusion Perspective and other spatial conventions The meaning of space and place

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. Create a painting from direct observation
    2. Recognize the principles of color theory
    3. Synthesize the principles of color theory in paint
    4. Create the illusion of volume, space and light using the basic techniques and principles of painting
    5. Demonstrate verbally and through writing, an understanding of the terms and concepts common to art/design and painting
    6. Demonstrate verbally and through writing, an understanding of the cultural/social/historical context in which paintings exist
    7. Demonstrate an understanding of the basic principles of design through painting and sketchbook exercises
    8. Develop an understanding of individual painting process, idea generation and personal expression through guided exercises and assignments
    9. Develop effective solutions to painting assignment problems using research, process sketches and idea generation

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    06. 01. Demonstrate awareness of the scope and variety of works in the arts and humanities.
    06. 02. Understand those works as expressions of individual and human values within an historical and social context.
    06. 03. Respond critically to works in the arts and humanities.
    06. 04. Engage in the creative process or interpretive performance.
    06. 05. Articulate an informed personal reaction to works in the arts and humanities.


    Courses and Registration

  
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    ART 1061 - Sculpture I

    Credits: 3
    Hours/Week: Lecture 2 Lab 2
    Course Description: This course introduces students to a variety of materials and processes common to sculpture. Hands-on projects expand 3D design concepts and encourage students to develop their creative ideas. Students will explore contemporary trends and applications, as well as research cultural traditions throughout history. Coursework includes access to Century’s FAB LAB, which can enhance projects, and connect students to projects around the world.
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): ART 1025 
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Historical/cultural overview
    2. Traditional and contemporary concepts
    3. 3D Design Principles Unity and variety Balance Scale Proportion Emphasis Repetition and rhythm
    4. Elements Plane Volume Mass Form Texture Line Color Space Light
    5. Form and content
    6. Materials and meaning
    7. Properties and characteristics of materials (possible materials listed below) Stone Clay Metals Wood Glass Fiber Plastic Found objects
    8. Additive and subtractive techniques
    9. Construction Methods Concept sketching Model making (and pointing-up to scale) FAB LAB and digital applications Thumbnails
    10. Studio and materials safety
    11. Physical considerations: weight, gravity, balance, mass, strength, volume
    12. Tension and Torsion
    13. Types of sculptures
      1. Relief
      2. Free standing
      3. Environmental
      4. Public
      5. Assemblage
      6. Installation
    14. Convergent and divergent thinking strategies
    15. Creative process and concept development
    16. Critiquing projects using terms and criteria common to art

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. apply 3D design concepts and elements toward an aesthetic and/or technical end.
    2. manipulate a variety of materials common to sculpture.
    3. describe the physical properties and functions of a variety of materials common to sculpture.
    4. safe studio procedures.
    5. describe safety hazards related to a variety of materials.
    6. create sculptures using both additive and subtractive techniques.
    7. construct sculptures that are structurally sound.
    8. evaluate projects using terms and criteria common to art.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


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  •  

    ART 1071 - Ceramics 1

    Credits: 3
    Hours/Week: Lecture 2 Lab 2
    Course Description: This course introduces basic hand-building and wheel techniques with clay. Students will examine the diverse cultural history of ceramic art and its continued relevance as a form of creative expression. The principles of 3 dimensional design, along with functional and non-functional applications, will be explored through a series of hands-on exercises and projects.
    MnTC Goals
    6 Humanities/Fine Arts

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Historical/Cultural Overview unction vs. non-functional traditions Cultural context and world traditions Traditional and contemporary approaches and applications The evolution of pottery
    2. Characteristics of Clay and Materials Types of clay bodies Preparation of clay Storage of materials Studio and materials safety Tools (traditional and non traditional) Kiln technology: stacking, types, terms safety, cones, firing of Glazing: chemistry, mixing, types, effects, limitations, tests, under/over glazes, terms
    3. Traditional Construction Processes Wedging techniques Hand-building techniques (coil, slab, pinch) Slips Molds Wheel- throwing techniques (wheel types, centering, opening and pulling)
    4. Visual communication/Visual relationships Construction using 3 imensional design principles: Proportional relationships/scale and aesthetics Hidden geometry (merging volumes and shapes) Mass vs, volume (sculpture vs. vessel) Application of 3 dimensional art elements and design principles Color and surface Form and function Creative problem solving (divergent and convergent strategies)

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate basic skill with hand building and wheel techniques toward a creative and/or technical end.
    2. Apply the principles of 3-dimensional design toward an aesthetic and/or functional end.
    3. Analyze the diverse and vast cultural history of pottery and ceramic art.
    4. Apply safe and effective technical procedures related to glaze chemistry and kiln technology.
    5. Analyze traditional and contemporary applications of clay.
    6. Critique projects using terms and criteria common to art.
    7. Engage in creative problem solving (divergent and convergent strategies)

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    06. 01. Demonstrate awareness of the scope and variety of works in the arts and humanities.
    06. 02. Understand those works as expressions of individual and human values within an historical and social context.
    06. 03. Respond critically to works in the arts and humanities.
    06. 04. Engage in the creative process or interpretive performance.
    06. 05. Articulate an informed personal reaction to works in the arts and humanities.


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    ART 1790 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1-3
    Hours/Week: Lecture None Lab None
    Course Description: Independent study is an opportunity for intermediate and advanced art students to complete an in-depth project or body of work in studio art or art-related research. This coure requires students to have completed all or most Art courses offered at Century College or provide proof (transcripts or portfolio) of completing college-level foundation art courses. This course requires project to be approved prior to enrollment.
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): Instructor and dean consent.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: This offering is meant to assist students who are planning to major in studio art, art history, or art education.

    Major Content
    To be determined by the student and instructor on an individual basis.
    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to: Demonstrate an increase of technical skill, historical knowledge, and/or conceptual scope in studio art or an art-related field.
    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    ART 2021 - History of Photography

    Credits: 3
    Hours/Week: Lecture 3 Lab None
    Course Description: This course surveys the works of artists throughout the world who have explored and defined the aesthetic boundaries of photography from the mediums invention to the present. The history of photography will be studied in terms of technological developments, social trends and personal expression. Lectures and reading assignments will focus on contextualizing photographs, in order to reveal their historic significance, content, and aesthetic form. Class discussions and writing assignments will introduce students to the basic methodological approaches to analyzing images.
    MnTC Goals
    6 Humanities/Fine Arts, 8 Global Perspective

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1020   with a grade of C or higher OR ENGL 1021  with a grade of C or higher.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. 19th Century Portraits
    2. Contemporary Uses
    3. Landscape and Architecture
    4. Manipulation
    5. Objects and Events
    6. Photography and Art: The First Phase
    7. Photography and Modernism
    8. Photography and Print Media
    9. Social Documentary
    10. The Early Years: Technology
    11. War Photography

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. compare and contrast major branches of photography, such as photojournalism, artistic expression, social and political statements, architectural, documentary, and commercial.
    2. analyze photographs by individuals who have had a significant impact in the aesthetic trends of the medium as an art form.
    3. critique the cultural and historical impact of iconic photographs.
    4. evaluate the relationship between photography and other modes of distributing information concerning events that shape history.
    5. describe the interrelationship between the evolution of photographic images and the style of painting and sculpture.
    6. identify the significant people, technological developments, events, and social trends in the invention and development of photography.
    7. define terms in the vocabulary of photographic imaging and history.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    06. 01. Demonstrate awareness of the scope and variety of works in the arts and humanities.
    06. 02. Understand those works as expressions of individual and human values within an historical and social context.
    06. 03. Respond critically to works in the arts and humanities.
    06. 05. Articulate an informed personal reaction to works in the arts and humanities.
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    08. 01. Describe and analyze political, economic, and cultural elements which influence relations of states and societies in their historical and contemporary dimensions.
    08. 02. Demonstrate knowledge of cultural, social, religious and linguistic differences.
    08. 03. Analyze specific international problems, illustrating the cultural, economic, and political differences that affect their solution.


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  •  

    ART 2031 - Photography II

    Credits: 3
    Hours/Week: Lecture 3 Lab None
    Course Description: This course will challenge students to consider different ways that a variety of photographic processes can be used to communicate ideas. Students will be introduced to the tools, applications and creative methods used in making traditional as well as, nontraditional, alternative, and non-silver photographic images. Through class critiques, discussions of the history of photography and contemporary trends in art, and reading and writing assignments, students will expand their ability to evaluate, interpret and express ideas through the use of the camera and light sensitive materials. A group field trip to a major metro area art venue is required.
    MnTC Goals
    6 Humanities/Fine Arts

    Prerequisite(s): ART 1031  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Review basic foundations of traditional photography Technical Parts of the camera Exposure Film developing Darkroom safety History Early beginnings. Science or Art? History of the camera obscura History Early beginnings. Science or Art? History of the camera obscura
    2. Introduction of alternative methods Pinhole cameras Construction of pinhole cameras Contemporary artist using handmade, plastic and toy cameras Visual elements/image design Visiting artist
    3. Non-silver and camera-less images. Cyanotypes, photogram and Cliché verre Niepse, Daguerre and Fox Talbot Historical and contemporary uses
    4. Image transfer Fabricated, staged, altered and appropriated photographs
    5. The Post Modern World and Global Art Interdisciplinary Utilize other materials such as text, sound, performance, objects, installation and time-based media Field Trip art venue TBA
    6. Collaboration Art and Science
    7. Visual narrative Photo essay, Non-linear and implied narrative, The artist book

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of critical thinking and intelligent image making through presentations, writing assignments, and expressive uses of the medium.
    2. Demonstrate research, reading, writing and verbal skills.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the creative process and studio practice.
    4. Utilize a vocabulary of terms related to the topics covered.
    5. Demonstrate an understanding of formal and theoretical concepts within art, specifically within the area of photography.
    6. Demonstrate the ability to expand basic knowledge of the materials into non-traditional, experimental and inventive solutions
    7. Illustrate an understanding of craftsmanship and presentation methods in their creative work.
    8. Identify various exemplary works of contemporary art as well as works of historical significance.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    06. 01. Demonstrate awareness of the scope and variety of works in the arts and humanities.
    06. 02. Understand those works as expressions of individual and human values within an historical and social context.
    06. 03. Respond critically to works in the arts and humanities.
    06. 04. Engage in the creative process or interpretive performance.
    06. 05. Articulate an informed personal reaction to works in the arts and humanities.


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    ART 2032 - Digital Photography

    Credits: 3
    Hours/Week: Lecture 3 Lab None
    Course Description: This course integrates aesthetic and technical challenges and strengthens visual problem solving skills utilizing the medium of digital photography. Students are introduced to the basics of Digital SLR cameras (DSLRs), image editing software and digital printing processes. Projects address a range of design, aesthetic, and conceptual issues fundamental to the art of digital photography. Strong emphasis is on the development of both a technical foundation and a critical awareness of the medium as a creative tool. This course requires 2 additional lab hours per week. Students are required to provide their own DSLR camera.
    MnTC Goals
    6 Humanities/Fine Arts

    Prerequisite(s): ART 1031  or VCT 1071  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Contemporary Issues/Criticism
      1. Context and interpretation
      2. Proliferation of digital images
      3. Ethics and digital manipulation
      4. Concepts of photography and truth
      5. Contemporary art and media
      6. Critique
    2. Introduction of photography as a creative tool
      1. Formal elements specific to the medium of photography
      2. Color theory
      3. Montage and manipulation
      4. Working with multiples: Diptychs, Triptychs, Grids
      5. Proposals and artist statements
    3. Technical Basics
      1. Introduction to the Digital SLR Camera
      2. Introduction to film and flatbed scanners
      3. Introduction to editing software, Adobe Bridge, Camera RAW, Lightroom and Photoshop
      4. Storage and workflow
      5. Introduction to inkjet printers
      6. Finishing and presentation

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. demonstrate an ability to critique artworks, utilizing terms common to art.
    2. demonstrate effective solutions to creative assignments applying knowledge of the materials, research of contemporary issues in art making, and creative problem solving skills.
    3. apply intermediate technical elements of photography, such as exposure and editing, printing, and methods of presentation.
    4. articulate formal and theoretical concepts within art, specifically within the area of digital photography.
    5. demonstrate advanced craftsmanship and presentation methods in their creative work.
    6. identify an extensive variety of exemplary works of contemporary art as well as works of historical significance.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    06. 01. Demonstrate awareness of the scope and variety of works in the arts and humanities.
    06. 02. Understand those works as expressions of individual and human values within an historical and social context.
    06. 03. Respond critically to works in the arts and humanities.
    06. 04. Engage in the creative process or interpretive performance.
    06. 05. Articulate an informed personal reaction to works in the arts and humanities.


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    ART 2041 - Drawing II

    Credits: 3
    Hours/Week: Lecture 2 Lab 2
    Course Description: This course expands and refines concepts covered in Drawing I. Additional topics include thematic intent and deeper investigation into the impact of composition. Students will also explore the properties of a variety of wet and dry materials, including color. Projects and exercises are based on direct observation of still life, the human form, architectural spaces, and nature. Coursework includes cultural/historical research and considers a range of contemporary professional applications.
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): ART 1041 
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: ART 1024 

    Major Content
    1. Historical/cultural overview
    2. Professional and industry applications of thematic drawing
    3. Traditional drawing strategies for creating the illusion of 3D form and space
    4. Contemporary approaches and trends
    5. Combining traditional and contemporary approaches to drawing
    6. The relationship between form, content, and subject matter
    7. Properties and functions of a wide range of drawing materials
      1. Color materials (for example,oil and/or dry color pastels)
      2. Tinted and toned papers
      3. Wet materials (for example, ink washes)
      4. Dry materials (charcoal, graphite, contes, pastels, chalks)
    8. Paper types, weights, and surfaces
    9. Composition principles
    10. Art elements
    11. Color theory applied to drawing
    12. Still life (various degrees of technical and conceptual complexity)
    13. Landscape
    14. Human form (portraiture)
    15. Architectural space (interior and exterior)
    16. Series (variations based on an intentional theme) and “extended” drawings
    17. Spatial devices (includes linear perspective)
    18. Relational measuring and sighting
    19. Abstraction
    20. Representation
    21. Conceptual processes
    22. Perceptual processes
    23. Divergent and convergent visual problem-solving
    24. Sketching and preliminary process drawings

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. develop a theme based (content oriented) series of drawings.
    2. apply the art elements to serve the visual impact, content or function of a drawing .
    3. analyze drawings using terms and criteria common to art.
    4. identify the range of professional applications of drawing.
    5. demonstrate the properties, function, and visual impact of a variety of drawing materials.
    6. demonstrate the function and visual impact of composition principles.
    7. solve visual problems using convergent and divergent thinking strategies.
    8. create the illusion of 3 dimensional form and space using traditional drawing strategies.
    9. identify the distinction between conceptual and perceptual processes.
    10. demonstrate both contemporary and traditional solutions to drawing projects.
    11. identify drawing styles from a variety of cultures and historical contexts.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


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  •  

    ART 2051 - Painting 2

    Credits: 3
    Hours/Week: Lecture 2 Lab 2
    Course Description: This course expands on the foundational concepts presented in Painting I. Emphasis is placed on traditional and experimental approaches to painting using water-based oils. Students will explore themes based on landscape, interior spaces, still life and the human form. Painting assignments are supported by sketchbook exercises, readings, discussions, and research of historic, cultural, and contemporary painting issues.
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): ART 1051 
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: ART 1024  and ART 1041 

    Major Content
    1. Materials
      1. Paint: Oil (Water soluble)
      2. Substrates: Stretched Canvas, Board, Masonite
      3. Historical, Cultural and Conceptual traditions and implications
      4. Solvents, mediums, waxes and varnishes
    2. Sketchbook as an idea journal
      1. Idea Generation
      2. Creative Problem Solving
      3. Writing an Artist Statement
      4. Generating personal metaphors and symbols
    3. Cultural/Historical awareness
      1. Historical painting/image making traditions and contemporary implications
      2. Contemporary painting issues/topics
      3. Historical overview of Landscape, Still-Life, Human form, Architectural Spaces
    4. Color
      1. Balance/Harmonies
      2. Warm/Cool
      3. Historical tradition/relevance
      4. Contemporary applications/implications
    5. Composition and Picture Plane
      1. Landscape conventions and dynamics
      2. Portraiture conventions and dynamics
      3. Still life conventions and dynamics
      4. Color placement
    6. Technique and Meaning
      1. Gesture, texture, expression and meaning
      2. Advanced Ala prima process and strategies
      3. Imprimatura underpainting process and strategies
      4. Glazing and Body Color
      5. Light and Luminosity
      6. Palette strategies/method
    7. Form
      1. Types of representation
      2. Modeling landscape from observation
      3. Modeling the human form from observation
      4. Complex still life modeling situations
      5. Conveying space and dimension in architectural settings (interior/exterior)
    8. Content
      1. Creating meaning through symbolic visual metaphor
      2. Creating meaning through individual aesthetic choices
      3. Landscape, Portraiture, Still-life, Architectural Spaces: contemporary and historical meaning
      4. Process as meaning
      5. Color and Meaning
      6. Materials as meaning
      7. Subject matter
    9. Spatial Conventions
      1. The meaning of pictorial space
      2. Historical spatial conventions
      3. Contemporary applications of illusionary space
      4. Personal definitions of Space and Place

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. demonstrate safe studio procedures.
    2. create a series of paintings that are conceptually linked.
    3. demonstrate technically sound applications of water-based oil paint and supporting materials.
    4. solve visual and technical problems using research.
    5. develop effective solutions to painting assignments rooted in historical and cultural awareness.
    6. generate ideas using process sketches
    7. create paintings showing a variety of space and color relationships.
    8. create paintings using a variety of compositional strategies.
    9. effectively manipulate oil paint to create the illusion of form and space through a variety of subject matter.
    10. develop an autonomous aesthetic decision-making process.
    11. critically analyze paintings in groups and individually using terms and criteria common to art.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


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  •  

    ART 2071 - Ceramics 2

    Credits: 3
    Hours/Week: Lecture 2 Lab 2
    Course Description: This course is an expansion of concepts covered in Ceramics I. Students will refine technical skills as well as explore design concepts of greater complexity. Coursework includes functional and nonfunctional applications, glazing techniques, effects and functions of various clay bodies, firing procedures, and studio safety. In addition, students will research the diverse history of ceramic art and pottery, including contemporary trends and movements.
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): ART 1071 
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: ART 1025 

    Major Content
    1. Historical/cultural movements of ceramic art throughout art history
    2. Major artists past and present
    3. Contemporary applications
    4. Functional applications (vessel orientation)
    5. Nonfunctional applications (vessel and sculptural)
    6. Combining vessel and sculptural approaches
    7. Techniques common to commercial production of functional ware
    8. Studio safety
    9. Glaze chemistry (effects and functions)
    10. Firing procedures (effects and functions)
    11. Clay bodies (effects and functions)
    12. Development and refinement of hand built construction techniques
    13. Development and refinement of wheel thrown construction techniques
    14. 3D design principles applied to ceramic a
    15. Elements of art applied to ceramic art
    16. Preliminary processes (sketching and clay models)
    17. Visual problem-solving (convergent and divergent strategies)

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. apply 3D design principles in both functional and nonfunctional projects. apply the elements of art toward an aesthetic, conceptual, and/or technical end.
    2. solve visual problems using convergent and divergent strategies.
    3. apply the elements of art toward an aesthetic, conceptual, and/or technical end.
    4. demonstrate safe studio practices.
    5. construct technically sound hand-built and wheel-thrown projects.
    6. manage glaze chemistry as it relates to visual effects and function.
    7. assist with firing procedures.
    8. select clay bodies that best suit the visual impact and function of their project.
    9. explore traditional and contemporary approaches ceramic art.
    10. recognize major historical/cultural ceramic movements and artists.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


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  •  

    ART 2099 - Portfolio: Professional Practices

    Credits: 2
    Hours/Week: Lecture 2 Lab None
    Course Description: This course presents topics related to the creation of professional materials common to the Art profession. In addition to the creation of a professional portfolio of art work, discussions will include presenting to galleries, creation of an artist resume, and professional studio practices. This class is part of the final semester of the AFA-Art degree.  This course requires sufficient credits in Art.
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): Instructor consent.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Portfolio types and purposes Assessing strong work Defining “presentation-ready”
    2. Documenting Artwork- strategies and purposes Choosing the correct format
    3. Artist Statement Purposes Know your audience
    4. Artist Professional Studio Practices Studio best practices Professional artist/designer introduction

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. create a professional quality portfolio.
    2. critically assess professional quality artwork.
    3. present a professional quality portfolio.
    4. create an artist statement.
    5. create an artist resume.
    6. critically discuss artwork using terms common to the art and design field.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration


Auto Body Technology

  
  •  

    ABOD 1005 - Auto Body Workplace Safety, Tool Usage, and Shop Operations

    Credits: 2
    Hours/Week: Lecture None Lab None
    Course Description: This hands-on course introduces students to the auto body industry standards for workplace safety, tool use, and shop operations. Students are exposed to career opportunities within the Auto Body industry. Group activities and shop work include shop safety and cleanliness, equipment maintenance, and the disassembly and reassembly of tools when repairing or cleaning. Students must be able to perform physical tasks to complete the course requirements.
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): Course placement into ENGL 0950  and RDNG 0950  or above OR completion of RDNG 0940  with a grade of C or higher OR course placement into ESOL 0051  and ESOL 0052  and ESOL 1033  OR completion of ESOL 0041  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0042  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0043  with a grade of C or higher; AND Arithmetic placement score of 64 or higher or elementary algebra placement score of 76 or higher or minimum placement score/ACT score placement into MATH 0070  or above or completion of MATH 0030  or MATH 0060  with a grade of C or higher; AND instructor consent.  We strongly encourage students who score below 64 to meet with an advisor or counselor to discuss their review and course options PRIOR to Math placement retesting or registering for a MATH course.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Safety procedures and precautions related to the auto body industry
    2. Identification of shop rules and safety precautions
    3. Proper operation of specialty equipment and tools
    4. Rules and expectations for safe classroom and shop use
    5. Maintenance and operational techniques of related tools and equipment
    6. Career opportunities related to the field of auto body technology

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course, students will be able to:

    1. identify safety procedures and precautions related to the auto body industry.
    2. implement shop rules and safety precautions.
    3. demonstrate the proper operation of specialty equipment and tools.
    4. follow classroom/shop procedures.
    5. perform general equipment maintenance.
    6. identify career opportunities with in the auto body industry.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    ABOD 1010 - Introduction to Welding for Auto Body

    Credits: 4
    Hours/Week: Lecture None Lab None
    Course Description: This course covers the identification and performance of gas, plasma cutting, and MIG equipment as it pertains to auto body. Topics include welding terms and safety procedures, setup, shutdown and performance on various gauges of steel in a variety of positions. Students will perform bead, lap and butt welding in the vertical and overhead positions. Students must be able to perform physical tasks to complete course requirements.
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Safety procedures
    2. MIG welding machine
    3. Welding techniques employed with MIG equipment
    4. Oxyacetylene welding equipment and techniques
    5. Weldable and non-weldable materials used in vehicle construction
    6. Plasma arc cutting of body panels
    7. Plasma cutting techniques

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. list safety procedures important in each welding operation.
    2. perform lap and butt vertical, tee flat and overhead MIG weld.
    3. perform MIG weld strength test.
    4. identify the two classes of welding.
    5. list safety procedures important in welding.
    6. identify oxyacetylene welding equipment and techiques.
    7. describe plasma arc cutting of body panels.
    8. demonstrate how to use a MIG welding machine.
    9. name the six basic welding techniques employed with MIG welding.
    10. describe plasma arc cutting of body panels.
    11. explain plasma cutting techniques.
    12. identify weldable and non-weldable materials used in vehicle construction.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    ABOD 1015 - Sheet Metal Repair

    Credits: 2
    Hours/Week: Lecture None Lab None
    Course Description: This hands-on course introduces students to the theory and practice of sheet metal repair. Topics include operational techniques for dent removal, including paintless dent removal, and panel straightening, as well as tools used for these techniques. Class activities include locating and identifying panel damage, as well as completing the repair. Students must be able to perform physical tasks to complete the course requirements.
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): Course placement into ENGL 0950  and RDNG 0950  or above OR completion of RDNG 0940  with a grade of C or higher OR course placement into ESOL 0051  and ESOL 0052  and ESOL 1033  OR completion of ESOL 0041  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0042  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0043  with a grade of C or higher; AND Arithmetic placement score of 64 or higher or elementary algebra placement score of 76 or higher or minimum placement score/ACT score placement into MATH 0070  or above or completion of MATH 0030  or MATH 0060  with a grade of C or higher; AND instructor consent. We strongly encourage students who score below 64 to meet with an advisor or counselor to discuss their review and course options PRIOR to Math placement retesting or registering for a MATH course.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Safety procedures and precautions related to auto body sheet metal repair
    2. Theory and operation of various hand tools and equipment designed to straighten sheet metal
    3. Location of sheet metal on the automobile
    4. Auto body nomenclature
    5. Basic sheet metal straightening procedures
    6. Maintenance and operational techniques of related hand tools and equipment designed for auto body sheet metal straightening

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course, students will be able to:

    1. describe basic sheet metal repair theory and operation.
    2. identify the different auto sections to correctly determine areas of damage.
    3. determine correct tool or tools required to complete the repair.
    4. demonstrate correct preparation and use of specialty tools and equipment.
    5. demonstrate basic sheet metal repair.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    ABOD 1025 - Corrosion Protection and Body Filling Techniques

    Credits: 4
    Hours/Week: Lecture None Lab None
    Course Description: This hands-on course introduces students to materials and techniques required for auto body corrosion protection and body fillers. Topics include mixing techniques, application procedures, sanding products and methods, abrasives, and corrosion protection. Students must be able to perform physical tasks to complete the course requirements by using all body fillers and corrosion inhibiters.
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): Course placement into ENGL 0950  and RDNG 0950  or above OR completion of RDNG 0940  with a grade of C or higher OR course placement into ESOL 0051  and ESOL 0052  and ESOL 1033  OR completion of ESOL 0041  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0042  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0043  with a grade of C or higher; AND Arithmetic placement score of 64 or higher or elementary algebra placement score of 76 or higher or minimum placement score/ACT score placement into MATH 0070  or above or completion of MATH 0030  or MATH 0060  with a grade of C or higher; AND instructor consent. We strongly encourage students who score below 64 to meet with an advisor or counselor to discuss their review and course options PRIOR to Math placement retesting or registering for a MATH course.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Types of body filler and when to use each type
    2. Theory and operation of various tools designed to apply body fillers
    3. Surface preparation
    4. Material preparation and application techniques
    5. Sanding tools and required abrasives
    6. Evaluation of work to determine if it is ready for the next step

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course, students will be able to:

    1. describe basic body fillers.
    2. identify many fillers commonly used in the auto body industry.
    3. identify appropriate body filler for repair required.
    4. use correct tools and abrasives required to complete the repair.
    5. demonstrate correct preparation of materials and mixing techniques.
    6. correctly use specialty tools and equipment.
    7. use appropriate sanding tools required.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    ABOD 1035 - Body Panels and Interior

    Credits: 4
    Hours/Week: Lecture None Lab None
    Course Description: This hands-on course introduces students to the materials and industry-approved techniques for removing and installing vehicle glass and all vehicle interior and exterior panels. Topics include assorted hardware, fasteners, trim, and tools; alignment techniques; and industry standards. Students must be able to perform physical tasks to complete course requirements.
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): Course placement into ENGL 0950  and RDNG 0950  or above OR completion of RDNG 0940  with a grade of C or higher OR course placement into ESOL 0051  and ESOL 0052  and ESOL 1033  OR completion of ESOL 0041  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0042  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0043  with a grade of C or higher; AND Arithmetic placement score of 64 or higher or elementary algebra placement score of 76 or higher or minimum placement score/ACT score placement into MATH 0070  or above or completion of MATH 0030  or MATH 0060  with a grade of C or higher; AND instructor consent. We strongly encourage students who score below 64 to meet with an advisor or counselor to discuss their review and course options PRIOR to Math placement retesting or registering for a MATH course.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Safety procedures and precautions related to automotive panel replacement, glass removal and installation
    2. Identification of glass removal tools, equipment, and products
    3. Proper fit for interior and exterior panels
    4. Identification and proper use of clips and fasteners for interior and exterior panels
    5. Interior and exterior panel and glass replacement

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course, students will be able to:

    1. remove and install stationary glass.
    2. remove and install both interior and exterior panels using correct clips and hardware.
    3. remove and/or install common bolts, fasteners, screws, and retainers.
    4. identify and use specialty trim and hardware tools.
    5. correctly remove and install interior and exterior molding and trim.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    ABOD 1045 - Damage Analysis and Estimating

    Credits: 2
    Hours/Week: Lecture None Lab None
    Course Description: This hands-on course introduces students to the theory and effects of force on shape and structural members. Class activities include identifying and isolating discrete damage sustained by collision; evaluating the collision damage; preparing collision damage reports and estimates using industry-accepted software and computerized estimating programs. Students must be able to perform physical tasks to complete course requirements.
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): Course placement into ENGL 0950  and RDNG 0950  or above OR completion of RDNG 0940  with a grade of C or higher OR course placement into ESOL 0051  and ESOL 0052  and ESOL 1033  OR completion of ESOL 0041  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0042  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0043  with a grade of C or higher; AND Arithmetic placement score of 64 or higher or elementary algebra placement score of 76 or higher or minimum placement score/ACT score placement into MATH 0070  or above or completion of MATH 0030  or MATH 0060  with a grade of C or higher; AND instructor consent. We strongly encourage students who score below 64 to meet with an advisor or counselor to discuss their review and course options PRIOR to Math placement retesting or registering for a MATH course.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Safety precautions when providing a damage analysis report
    2. Identification of various manufacturer structural designs
    3. Identification and documentation of damage sources
    4. Creation of computerized damage reports and estimates using professional collision estimation software
    5. Damage analysis and repair cost estimation

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course, students will be able to:

    1. identify the various structural designs used in the manufacturing of an automobile and how they are affected by collision energy.
    2. identify and distinguish the difference between direct and indirect damage.
    3. identify damage sustained while performing a visual inspection of the damaged vehicle.
    4. provide computerized estimates and damage reports using up-to-date collision software.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    ABOD 1055 - Refinishing Exterior Vehicle Surfaces

    Credits: 4
    Hours/Week: Lecture None Lab None
    Course Description: This hands-on course introduces students to the theory and practice of refinishing exterior vehicle surfaces. Topics include the operation of refinishing tools and materials, safety issues, environmental concerns, water-based and solvent-based paint, and paint procedures related to collision repair. Students must be able to perform physical tasks to complete course requirements.
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): Course placement into ENGL 0950  and RDNG 0950  or above OR completion of RDNG 0940  with a grade of C or higher OR course placement into ESOL 0051  and ESOL 0052  and ESOL 1033  OR completion of ESOL 0041  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0042  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0043  with a grade of C or higher; AND Arithmetic placement score of 64 or higher or elementary algebra placement score of 76 or higher or minimum placement score/ACT score placement into MATH 0070  or above or completion of MATH 0030  or MATH 0060  with a grade of C or higher; AND i nstructor consent.  We strongly encourage students who score below 64 to meet with an advisor or counselor to discuss their review and course options PRIOR to Math placement retesting or registering for a MATH course.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Safety procedures and precautions related to auto body refinishing
    2. Theory and understanding of how solvents are used in the refinishing industry
    3. Proper identification and handling of refinishing materials
    4. Ground coat and top coat mixing instructions and how to obtain them
    5. Maintenance and operation of specialty refinishing equipment

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course, students will be able to:

    1. identify safety procedures and precautions related to auto body refinishing.
    2. understand how solvents are used in the refinishing industry.
    3. identify primer sealers, primer surfacers, and clear coats in order to describe their functions.
    4. control the variables that affect the quality and speed of refinishing.
    5. identify and demonstrate correct ways for mixing automotive refinishing products.
    6. demonstrate the proper operation of specialty auto body refinishing equipment and tools for mixing materials.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    ABOD 1065 - Auto Body Paint Concerns

    Credits: 2
    Hours/Week: Lecture None Lab None
    Course Description: This hands-on course introduces students to the theory, processes, and techniques of paint application. Topics include identifying the likely causes of and corrective measures for many paint defects, as well as common problems encountered during the paint application process. Students must be able to perform physical tasks to complete course requirements.
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): Course placement into ENGL 0950  and RDNG 0950  or above OR completion of RDNG 0940  with a grade of C or higher OR course placement into ESOL 0051  and ESOL 0052  and ESOL 1033  OR completion of ESOL 0041  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0042  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0043  with a grade of C or higher; AND Arithmetic placement score of 64 or higher or elementary algebra placement score of 76 or higher or minimum placement score/ACT score placement into MATH 0070  or above or completion of MATH 0030  or MATH 0060  with a grade of C or higher; AND instructor consent. We strongly encourage students who score below 64 to meet with an advisor or counselor to discuss their review and course options PRIOR to Math placement retesting or registering for a MATH course.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Safety procedures and precautions related to paint problems and precautions
    2. Identification of common problems and defects that occur during the refinishing process
    3. Strategies and techniques for prevention and correction of common paint concerns

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course, students will be able to:

    1. use appropriate safety measures during the prevention and correction of paint defects.
    2. control the variables affecting the quality and speed of refinishing.
    3. identify the root causes of various paint finish defects.
    4. repair common paint finish concerns.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    ABOD 1075 - Plastic Repair

    Credits: 2
    Hours/Week: Lecture None Lab None
    Course Description: This hands-on course introduces students to the theory and operational techniques for working with the different types of plastics found in modern vehicles. Topics include safety issues, methods of plastic repair, benefits of repair, and the proper set up and operation of plastic welders. Students must be able to perform physical tasks to complete course requirements.
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): Course placement into ENGL 0950  and RDNG 0950  or above OR completion of RDNG 0940  with a grade of C or higher OR course placement into ESOL 0051  and ESOL 0052  and ESOL 1033  OR completion of ESOL 0041  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0042  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0043  with a grade of C or higher; AND Arithmetic placement score of 64 or higher or elementary algebra placement score of 76 or higher or minimum placement score/ACT score placement into MATH 0070  or above or completion of MATH 0030  or MATH 0060  with a grade of C or higher; AND instructor consent. We strongly encourage students who score below 64 to meet with an advisor or counselor to discuss their review and course options PRIOR to Math placement retesting or registering for a MATH course.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Safety procedures and precautions related to plastic repair
    2. Identification of different types of plastics found in modern vehicles
    3. Proper set up and operation of plastic repair equipment
    4. Benefits of plastic welding
    5. Repairs of interior and exterior plastic components
    6. Maintenance and operational techniques of related tools and equipment

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course, students will be able to:

    1. identify safety procedures and precautions related to plastic repair.
    2. identify different types of plastics found on new vehicle construction.
    3. identify different methods of plastic repair.
    4. explain the benefits and cost savings of plastic repair.
    5. demonstrate proper operation of specialty equipment and tools.
    6. control the variables that affect the quality and speed of refinishing.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    ABOD 1085 - Frame Repair

    Credits: 2
    Hours/Week: Lecture None Lab None
    Course Description: This hands-on course introduces students to the techniques and processes for repairing frame damage following a vehicle collision. Topics include safety issues, universal measuring systems, vehicle structures and their corresponding repair techniques, and frame-straightening procedures. Students must be able to perform physical tasks to complete course requirements.
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): Course placement into ENGL 0950  and RDNG 0950  or above OR completion of RDNG 0940  with a grade of C or higher OR course placement into ESOL 0051  and ESOL 0052  and ESOL 1033  OR completion of ESOL 0041  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0042  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0043  with a grade of C or higher; AND Arithmetic placement score of 64 or higher or elementary algebra placement score of 76 or higher or minimum placement score/ACT score placement into MATH 0070  or above or completion of MATH 0030  or MATH 0060  with a grade of C or higher; AND instructor consent. We strongly encourage students who score below 64 to meet with an advisor or counselor to discuss their review and course options PRIOR to Math placement retesting or registering for a MATH course.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Safety procedures and precautions related to auto body frame straightening equipment
    2. Automobile construction and frame design
    3. Universal measuring systems
    4. Theory and operation of frame straightening equipment

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course, students will be able to:

    1. identify safety procedures and precautions related to safely operating straightening equipment.
    2. operate universal measuring systems.
    3. identify different types of automobile structures and their corresponding repair techniques.
    4. perform frame straightening procedures.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    ABOD 1095 - Detailing and Final Delivery

    Credits: 4
    Hours/Week: Lecture None Lab None
    Course Description: This hands-on course introduces students to the techniques for preparing and detailing vehicles after repair and refinishing. Topics include safety issues, surface preparation and cleaning, detailing tools and materials, and final inspection. Students must be able to perform physical tasks to complete course requirements.
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): Course placement into ENGL 0950  and RDNG 0950  or above OR completion of RDNG 0940  with a grade of C or higher OR course placement into ESOL 0051  and ESOL 0052  and ESOL 1033  OR completion of ESOL 0041  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0042  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0043  with a grade of C or higher; AND Arithmetic placement score of 64 or higher or elementary algebra placement score of 76 or higher or minimum placement score/ACT score placement into MATH 0070  or above or completion of MATH 0030  or MATH 0060  with a grade of C or higher; AND instructor consent. We strongly encourage students who score below 64 to meet with an advisor or counselor to discuss their review and course options PRIOR to Math placement retesting or registering for a MATH course.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Safety procedures and precautions related to automotive detailing
    2. Theory and operation of polishing compounds and buffing pads
    3. Specialty sanding pads and distinct sandpaper grits for removing certain imperfections in the paint surface
    4. Basic buffing techniques
    5. Final detailing techniques
    6. Delivery preparation

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course, students will be able to:

    1. identify safety procedures and precautions related to detailing.
    2. identify and describe the individual buffing materials used in detailing.
    3. demonstrate wet sanding techniques.
    4. remove runs from painted and clear-coated surfaces.
    5. remove dirt from painted and clear-coated surfaces.
    6. complete a general overall cleaning of the vehicle.
    7. complete a thorough vehicle inspection prior to final delivery.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    ABOD 1105 - Introduction to Electrical Principles

    Credits: 3
    Hours/Week: Lecture None Lab None
    Course Description: This hands-on course introduces students to fundamental automotive electrical concepts, including wiring repair, multimeter use, electric circuit design and components, writing diagram interpretation, scan tool use, and basic diagnostic procedures. Students practice on training boards before testing and repairing live vehicles. Students must be able to perform physical tasks to complete course requirements.
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): Course placement into ENGL 0950  and RDNG 0950  or above OR completion of RDNG 0940  with a grade of C or higher OR course placement into ESOL 0051  and ESOL 0052  and ESOL 1033  OR completion of ESOL 0041  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0042  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0043  with a grade of C or higher; AND Arithmetic placement score of 64 or higher or elementary algebra placement score of 76 or higher or minimum placement score/ACT score placement into MATH 0070  or above or completion of MATH 0030  or MATH 0060  with a grade of C or higher; AND instructor consent. We strongly encourage students who score below 64 to meet with an advisor or counselor to discuss their review and course options PRIOR to Math placement retesting or registering for a MATH course.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Safety practices related to automotive electrical systems
    2. Electrical wiring and connector repair
    3. Multimeter use
    4. Circuit types and components
    5. Location of repair information
    6. Schematic diagram reading
    7. Scan tool use
    8. Basic diagnostic and repair procedures

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course, students will be able to:

    1. observe safety practices related to working with automotive batteries and electricity.
    2. repair electrical wiring and connectors to industry standards.
    3. use a multimeter to measure circuit/component voltage, amperage and resistance.
    4. identify circuit types and components; understand key operational and diagnostic differences.
    5. locate wiring diagrams and other repair information using online repair information services.
    6. read and interpret automotive wiring diagrams.
    7. use an automotive scan tool to retrieve fault codes, view input data, and actuate outputs.
    8. perform basic circuit fault diagnosis and repair/replacement procedures.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    ABOD 1115 - Introduction to Supplemental Restraint Systems

    Credits: 1
    Hours/Week: Lecture None Lab None
    Course Description: This hands-on course introduces students to the theory and techniques for repairing automotive supplemental restraint systems, including air bags, curtain bags, and seat belt pretensioners, as well as related modules, sensors, and components. Activities include safely disarming supplemental restraint systems and replacing individual system components. Students must be able to perform physical tasks to complete course requirements.
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): Course placement into ENGL 0950  and RDNG 0950  or above OR completion of RDNG 0940  with a grade of C or higher OR course placement into ESOL 0051  and ESOL 0052  and ESOL 1033  OR completion of ESOL 0041  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0042  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0043  with a grade of C or higher; AND Arithmetic placement score of 64 or higher or elementary algebra placement score of 76 or higher or minimum placement score/ACT score placement into MATH 0070  or above or completion of MATH 0030  or MATH 0060  with a grade of C or higher; AND instructor consent. We strongly encourage students who score below 64 to meet with an advisor or counselor to discuss their review and course options PRIOR to Math placement retesting or registering for a MATH course.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Supplemental restraint system theory and component operation
    2. Supplemental restraint system disarming
    3. Supplemental restraint system component replacement
    4. Supplemental restraint system fault code retrieval and erasure

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course, students will be able to:

    1. explain the basic theory of supplemental restraint systems.
    2. locate disarming procedures and safely disarm supplemental restraint systems.
    3. replace basic supplemental restraint system components.
    4. use a scan tool to retrieve and erase supplemental restraint system fault codes.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    ABOD 1125 - Introduction to Alignment, Brakes, and Suspension

    Credits: 2
    Hours/Week: Lecture None Lab None
    Course Description: This hands-on course introduces students to the theory and practice of working with vehicle steering, suspension, and braking systems, as well as basic vehicle alignment. Topics include safety issues; part identification and inspection; and appropriate system adjustments, repair, replacement, and/or rebuilding. Students must be able to perform physical tasks to complete course requirements.
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): Course placement into ENGL 0950  and RDNG 0950  or above OR completion of RDNG 0940  with a grade of C or higher OR course placement into ESOL 0051  and ESOL 0052  and ESOL 1033  OR completion of ESOL 0041  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0042  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0043  with a grade of C or higher; AND Arithmetic placement score of 64 or higher or elementary algebra placement score of 76 or higher or minimum placement score/ACT score placement into MATH 0070  or above or completion of MATH 0030  or MATH 0060  with a grade of C or higher; AND instructor consent. We strongly encourage students who score below 64 to meet with an advisor or counselor to discuss their review and course options PRIOR to Math placement retesting or registering for a MATH course.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Safety procedures and precautions related to steering, suspension, brakes, and alignment
    2. Theory, operation, and part identification of steering systems
    3. Theory, operation, and part identification of suspension systems
    4. Theory, operation, and part identification of brake systems
    5. Repair of steering, suspension, and brake systems
    6. Alignment angle theory of caster, camber, and toe
    7. Basic alignment procedures

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course, students will be able to:

    1. identify safety procedures and precautions related to steering, suspension, brakes and alignment.
    2. describe basic steering, suspension, brake, and alignment theory and operation.
    3. identify basic steering, suspension, and brake components and related parts.
    4. demonstrate basic repairs of steering, suspension, and brake systems.
    5. identify mechanical alignment adjustments.
    6. demonstrate the setup procedure of a vehicle on an alignment rack.
    7. complete a vehicle alignment to industry standards using mechanical adjustments.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    ABOD 1135 - Introduction to Automotive Air Conditioning

    Credits: 2
    Hours/Week: Lecture None Lab None
    Course Description: This hands-on course introduces students to the theory, operation, and service of automotive air conditioning systems. Topics include the repair, evacuation, leak detection, and performance testing of AC systems to industry standards. Students must be able to perform physical tasks to complete course requirements.
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): Course placement into ENGL 0950  and RDNG 0950  or above OR completion of RDNG 0940  with a grade of C or higher OR course placement into ESOL 0051  and ESOL 0052  and ESOL 1033  OR completion of ESOL 0041  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0042  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0043  with a grade of C or higher; AND Arithmetic placement score of 64 or higher or elementary algebra placement score of 76 or higher or minimum placement score/ACT score placement into MATH 0070  or above or completion of MATH 0030  or MATH 0060  with a grade of C or higher; AND instructor consent. We strongly encourage students who score below 64 to meet with an advisor or counselor to discuss their review and course options PRIOR to Math placement retesting or registering for a MATH course.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Safety procedures and precautions related to automotive air conditioning systems
    2. Air conditioning operational theory
    3. Identification of automotive air conditioning parts and components
    4. Proper identification and handling of refrigerant
    5. Automotive air conditioning diagnosis, leak detection, performance testing, and service
    6. Prepare to take the AC refrigerant, recycling, and recovery test
    7. Maintenance and operational techniques of related tools and equipment

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course, students will be able to:

    1. identify safety procedures and precautions related to air conditioning systems.
    2. describe theory and operation of automotive air conditioning systems.
    3. identify air conditioning components and related parts.
    4. evacuate and recharge conditioning systems to industry standards.
    5. diagnose, leak check, performance test, and service air conditioning systems.
    6. obtain the ac refrigerant, recycling, and recovery certificate.
    7. demonstrate proper operation of specialty equipment and tools.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    ABOD 1790 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1-3
    Hours/Week: Lecture None Lab None
    Course Description: An opportunity for an in-depth study of a particular topic.
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): Instructor and dean consent.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    To be determined by the student and instructor on an individual basis.
    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to: To be determined on individual basis according to the nature of the independent study.
    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration


Automotive Service Technology

  
  •  

    AST 1005 - Automotive Workplace Safety

    Credits: 1
    Hours/Week: Lecture 1 Lab None
    Course Description: This course covers safe practices in the automotive workplace. Topics include the labeling, handling, storage, removal, disposal, and recycling of hazardous and toxic materials, Minnesota Right to Know Act, and emergency shop procedures. Students must be able to perform physical tasks to complete course requirements. This course requires completion of or to be concurrently enrolled in AST 1015 , AST 1025 , AST 1035  , and AST 1045  or concurrently enrolled in AST 1055 , AST 1065 , AST 1075 , AST 1085 , and AST 1095 .
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): Course placement into ENGL 0950  and RDNG 0950  or above OR completion of RDNG 0940  with a grade of C or higher OR course placement into ESOL 0051  and ESOL 0052  and ESOL 1033  OR completion of ESOL 0041  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0042  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0043  with a grade of C or higher; AND Arithmetic placement score of 64 or higher or elementary algebra placement score of 76 or higher or minimum placement score/ACT score placement into MATH 0070  or above or completion of MATH 0030  or MATH 0060  with a grade of C or higher AND instructor consent. We strongly encourage students who score below 64 to meet with an advisor or counselor to discuss their review and course options PRIOR to Math placement retesting or registering for a MATH course.
     
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Automotive shop safety practices
    2. Use of automotive safety equipment
    3. Automotive personal protection equipment
    4. Automotive equipment safety
    5. Automotive Material Safety Data Sheet
    6. Handling, storage, removal, and disposal of chemicals in an automotive shop
    7. Automotive OSHA regulations
    8. Minnesota Right to Know Act
    9. SP2 Online Training

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. demonstrate automotive shop safety practices.
    2. demonstrate the use of automotive safety equipment.
    3. identify personal protection equipment.
    4. describe automotive equipment safety practices.
    5. identify locations of automotive Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS).
    6. explain the content of automotive Material Safety Data Sheets.
    7. describe the proper handling, storage, removal, and disposal of chemicals in an automotive shop.
    8. identify automotive Occupational Safety Health Act (OSHA).
    9. explain the Minnesota Right to Know Act.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    AST 1015 - Automotive Brakes

    Credits: 4
    Hours/Week: Lecture 2 Lab 4
    Course Description: This course covers drum and disc brake systems, hydraulic systems, power brakes, and the basic theory of anti-lock brake systems. Theory, diagnosis, adjustment, and complete system rebuilding will be included during group discussions and shop applications. Students must be able to perform physical tasks to complete course requirements. This course requires completion of or to be concurrently enrolled in AST 1005 , AST 1025 , AST 1035 , and AST 1045 .
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): Course placement into ENGL 0950  and RDNG 0950  or above OR completion of RDNG 0940  with a grade of C or higher OR course placement into ESOL 0051  and ESOL 0052  and ESOL 1033  OR completion of ESOL 0041  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0042  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0043  with a grade of C or higher; AND Arithmetic placement score of 64 or higher or elementary algebra placement score of 76 or higher or minimum placement score/ACT score placement into MATH 0070  or above or completion of MATH 0030  or MATH 0060  with a grade of C or higher AND instructor consent. We strongly encourage students who score below 64 to meet with an advisor or counselor to discuss their review and course options PRIOR to Math placement retesting or registering for a MATH course.

     
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content

    1. Safety procedures and precautions related to automotive brake systems and service.
    2. Brake hydraulics
    3. Fluid pressure control
    4. Brake hoses and lines
    5. Master cylinder
    6. Power brakes
    7. Drum brakes
    8. Disc brakes
    9. Measuring
    10. Electrical
    11. Brake diagnosis
    12. Antilock braking systems
    13. Maintenance and operational techniques of related tools and equipment

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. identify safety procedures and precautions related to brake systems.
    2. demonstrate micrometer measuring.
    3. perform correct applicable machining techniques.
    4. demonstrate the proper operation of specialty equipment and tools.
    5. perform NATEF tasks related to automotive brake systems
    6. describe brake system operation and theory.
    7. identify brake system components and related parts.
    8. rebuild brake systems to industry standards.
    9. describe anti-lock brake system theory and operation.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    AST 1025 - Steering and Suspension Systems

    Credits: 3
    Hours/Week: Lecture 2 Lab 2
    Course Description: This course provides the basis for repairs and adjustments to the steering and suspension systems found on the modern automobile. Operating design theory, diagnosis, adjustment, and repair are included during group discussions and shop applications. Students must be able to perform physical tasks to complete course requirements. This course requires completion of or to be concurrently enrolled in AST 1005 , AST 1015  , AST 1035 , and AST 1045 .
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): Course placement into ENGL 0950  and RDNG 0950  or above OR completion of RDNG 0940  with a grade of C or higher OR course placement into ESOL 0051  and ESOL 0052  and ESOL 1033  OR completion of ESOL 0041  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0042  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0043  with a grade of C or higher; AND Arithmetic placement score of 64 or higher or elementary algebra placement score of 76 or higher or minimum placement score/ACT score placement into MATH 0070  or above or completion of MATH 0030  or MATH 0060  with a grade of C or higher AND instructor consent. We strongly encourage students who score below 64 to meet with an advisor or counselor to discuss their review and course options PRIOR to Math placement retesting or registering for a MATH course.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Suspension
    2. Frame and suspension designs
    3. Suspension types
    4. Springs
    5. Shock absorbers
    6. Stabilizer bar and links
    7. Bushing service
    8. Ball joints
    9. Diagnosing suspension systems

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. identify safety procedures and precautions related to four wheel alignment.
    2. describe steering and suspension system operation and theory.
    3. identify steering and suspension system components and related parts.
    4. rebuild suspension and steering systems to industry standards.
    5. demonstrate the proper operation of specialty equipment and tools.
    6. perform NATEF tasks related to steering and suspension systems.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    AST 1035 - Four-Wheel Alignment

    Credits: 4
    Hours/Week: Lecture 2 Lab 4
    Course Description: This course covers diagnosis, corrections, and adjustments of the steering and suspension systems to correct poor handling, noise, and abnormal tire wear. Alignment theory, pre-alignment inspection, and adjustments using factory adjustments and after-market modifications on modern equipment are covered in group discussions and shop applications. Students must be able to perform physical tasks to complete course requirements. This course requires students to be concurrently enrolled in AST 1005 , AST 1015  , AST 1025 , and AST 1045 .
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): Course placement into ENGL 0950  and RDNG 0950  or above OR completion of RDNG 0940  with a grade of C or higher OR course placement into ESOL 0051  and ESOL 0052  and ESOL 1033  OR completion of ESOL 0041  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0042  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0043  with a grade of C or higher; AND Arithmetic placement score of 64 or higher or elementary algebra placement score of 76 or higher or minimum placement score/ACT score placement into MATH 0070  or above or completion of MATH 0030  or MATH 0060  with a grade of C or higher AND instructor consent. We strongly encourage students who score below 64 to meet with an advisor or counselor to discuss their review and course options PRIOR to Math placement retesting or registering for a MATH course.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Safety procedures and precautions related to four wheel alignment
    2. Pre-alignment inspection
    3. Tire wear
    4. Alignment geometry
    5. Pulls and drifts
    6. Alignment instrumentation demonstration
    7. Wheel alignment procedures
    8. Maintenance and operational techniques of related tools and equipment.

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. identify safety procedures and precautions related to four-wheel alignment.
    2. describe four-wheel alignment theory and function.
    3. identify alignment angles and their functions.
    4. perform adjustments to industry standards.
    5. demonstrate mechanical and after-market alignment adjustments.
    6. demonstrate the proper operation of specialty equipment and tools.
    7. perform NATEF tasks related to four wheel alignment.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    AST 1045 - Standard Drive Train

    Credits: 4
    Hours/Week: Lecture 2 Lab 4
    Course Description: This course covers the theory and operation of manual transmissions/transaxles,clutches, RWD, universal joints, FWD, constant velocity joints, differentials, and 4-wheel drive systems. Group activities and shop work include the adjustments, repair, replacement and/or rebuilding of these units. Students must be able to perform physical tasks to complete course requirements. This course requires completion of or to be concurrently enrolled in AST 1005 , AST 1015 , AST 1025 , and AST 1035 .
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): Course placement into ENGL 0950  and RDNG 0950  or above OR completion of RDNG 0940  with a grade of C or higher OR course placement into ESOL 0051  and ESOL 0052  and ESOL 1033  OR completion of ESOL 0041  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0042  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0043  with a grade of C or higher; AND Arithmetic placement score of 64 or higher or elementary algebra placement score of 76 or higher or minimum placement score/ACT score placement into MATH 0070  or above or completion of MATH 0030  or MATH 0060  with a grade of C or higher AND instructor consent. We strongly encourage students who score below 64 to meet with an advisor or counselor to discuss their review and course options PRIOR to Math placement retesting or registering for a MATH course.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Safety procedures and precautions related to automotive drive trains
    2. Clutch fundamentals, diagnosis, and service
    3. Manual transmission and transaxle fundamentals, diagnosis, and repair
    4. FWD fundamentals, diagnosis, and
    5. RWD fundamentals, diagnosis, and service
    6. Driveline vibration
    7. Maintenance and operational techniques of related tools and equipment

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. identify safety procedures and precautions related to standard drive train.
    2. describe standard drive train theory and operation.
    3. identify manual drive train components and related parts.
    4. rebuild manual drive train systems to industry standards.
    5. demonstrate the proper operation of specialty equipment and tools.
    6. perform NATEF tasks related to manual drive train systems

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    AST 1055 - Automotive Service

    Credits: 2
    Hours/Week: Lecture 1 Lab 2
    Course Description: This course covers all of the tasks that are required for a person starting in the automotive field. Topics include automotive tools and equipment, perform tire service, lubrication, safety inspection, aim headlights, exhaust repair, drill and tap threads, install a helicoil, and interpret numbers associated with automotive repairs. Students must be able to perform physical tasks to complete course requirements.
    Prerequisite(s):  Concurrently enrolled in AST 1005 , AST 1065 , AST 1075 , AST 1085 , and AST 1095 .
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): Course placement into ENGL 0950  and RDNG 0950  or above OR completion of RDNG 0940  with a grade of C or higher OR course placement into ESOL 0051  and ESOL 0052  and ESOL 1033  OR completion of ESOL 0041  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0042  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0043  with a grade of C or higher; AND Arithmetic placement score of 64 or higher or elementary algebra placement score of 76 or higher or minimum placement score/ACT score placement into MATH 0070  or above or completion of MATH 0030  or MATH 0060  with a grade of C or higher AND instructor consent. We strongly encourage students who score below 64 to meet with an advisor or counselor to discuss their review and course options PRIOR to Math placement retesting or registering for a MATH course.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Hand tools
    2. Aim headlights
    3. Tires Change Repair Balance
    4. Vehicle safety inspection
    5. Vehicle lubrication
    6. Vehicle oil change
    7. Exhaust repair
    8. Drill and tap threads
    9. Install helicoil
    10. Interpret numbers
    11. Discuss safety steps and precautions in each of the above

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. follow all safety procedures and precautions.
    2. aim headlights.
    3. perform vehicle safety inspection
    4. perform lubrication and oil change.
    5. repair exhaust systems.
    6. drill and tap threads.
    7. install helicoils.
    8. perform automotive-related mathematical functions by hand.
    9. perform NATEF tasks related to this course.
    10. use automotive hand tools correctly.
    11. change, balance, and repair a tire.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    AST 1065 - Electrical Principles

    Credits: 3
    Hours/Week: Lecture 2 Lab 2
    Course Description: This course covers electrical terms, what electricity is, what it does as it flows through a circuit, series and parallel circuits, Ohms Law, how to connect and use a DVOM, battery theory, and how to test batteries using a VAT-40. Students must be able to perform physical tasks to complete course requirements. This course requires completion of or to be concurrently enrolled in AST 1005 , AST 1055 , AST 1075 , AST 1085 , and AST 1095 .
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): Course placement into ENGL 0950  and RDNG 0950  or above OR completion of RDNG 0940  with a grade of C or higher OR course placement into ESOL 0051  and ESOL 0052  and ESOL 1033  OR completion of ESOL 0041  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0042  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0043  with a grade of C or higher; AND Arithmetic placement score of 64 or higher or elementary algebra placement score of 76 or higher or minimum placement score/ACT score placement into MATH 0070  or above or completion of MATH 0030  or MATH 0060  with a grade of C or higher AND instructor consent. We strongly encourage students who score below 64 to meet with an advisor or counselor to discuss their review and course options PRIOR to Math placement retesting or registering for a MATH course.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Electrical Terms
    2. Circuits Components Series Parallel Series Parallel Circuit Principles
    3. Electrical Principles Magnetism Electromagnetic Induction Electromagnetic Induction
    4. Ohms Law Total resistance of a series circuit Total resistance of a parallel circuit Total resistance of a series parallel circuit
    5. Meter Connections in Circuits. Measure voltage Measure ohms measure amperage
    6. Construct Circuits. Design circuits Construct series circuits Construct parallel circuits Construct series parallel circuits
    7. Trace Circuits on Wiring Diagrams. Horn Parking and Headlight Turn and Brake Lights Ignition Starting
    8. Electrical Symbols
    9. Battery Construction and Components
    10. Battery Theory and Operation
    11. Safety Procedures
    12. Battery Test Procedures
      1. Specific gravity tests
      2. Load test
      3. 3 minute charge test
    13. Test Result Interpretation
    14. Battery Charger Procedures
    15. Jumper Cable Procedures
    16. Perform NATEF tasks during lab and shop times

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. follow all safety procedures and precautions.
    2. connect battery chargers and jumper cables correctly.
    3. perform NATEF tasks related to this course
    4. define electrical terms and principles.
    5. identify battery construction and operation.
    6. construct series, parallel and series parallel circuits.
    7. trace circuits on vehicle wiring diagrams.
    8. identify electrical symbols.
    9. perform DVOM and VAT 40 tests.
    10. interpret test results.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    AST 1075 - Body Electrical Systems

    Credits: 2
    Hours/Week: Lecture 1 Lab 2
    Course Description: This course introduces the student to reading wiring diagrams and testing common automotive electrical circuits. In this course, students will be exposed to wiring diagrams and how to test power door locks, power windows, the turn and brake light circuits, the blower motor circuits, parking, headlights and dimmer circuits, along with the wipers and washer circuits. Students will practice on training boards and then move into testing and repair on live vehicles. Students must be able to perform physical tasks to complete course requirements. This course requires completion of or to be concurrently enrolled in AST 1005 , AST 1055 , AST 1065  , AST 1085 , and AST 1095 .
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): Course placement into ENGL 0950  and RDNG 0950  or above OR completion of RDNG 0940  with a grade of C or higher OR course placement into ESOL 0051  and ESOL 0052  and ESOL 1033  OR completion of ESOL 0041  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0042  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0043  with a grade of C or higher; AND Arithmetic placement score of 64 or higher or elementary algebra placement score of 76 or higher or minimum placement score/ACT score placement into MATH 0070  or above or completion of MATH 0030  or MATH 0060  with a grade of C or higher AND instructor consent. We strongly encourage students who score below 64 to meet with an advisor or counselor to discuss their review and course options PRIOR to Math placement retesting or registering for a MATH course.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Circuit Tests Power Source Load Controls Use DVOM Use Test Light Use Jumper Wires
    2. Test power door lock circuits
    3. Test power window circuits
    4. Test turn signal circuits
    5. Test brake light circuits
    6. Test blower motor circuits
    7. Test parking light circuits
    8. Test headlight circuits
    9. Test wiper circuits
    10. Test washer circuits
    11. Test gauge operation
    12. Test driver information and warning systems
    13. Perform NATEF tasks during lab and shop times
    14. Safety procedures

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. read schematics and wiring diagrams.
    2. test body electrical circuits.
    3. perform NATEF tasks related to body electrical circuits.
    4. follow all safety precautions related to this course.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    AST 1085 - Starting and Charging Systems

    Credits: 4
    Hours/Week: Lecture 2 Lab 4
    Course Description: In this course, students will study the components, circuits, and theory of operation of the starting and charging systems. Students will use test equipment, diagnostic procedures, and flowcharts to interpret test results so that the correct repairs will be performed on inoperative starting and charging systems. Students must be able to perform physical tasks to complete course requirements. This course requires completion of or to be concurrently enrolled in AST 1005 , AST 1055 , AST 1065 , AST 1075 , and AST 1095 .
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): Course placement into ENGL 0950  and RDNG 0950  or above OR completion of RDNG 0940  with a grade of C or higher OR course placement into ESOL 0051  and ESOL 0052  and ESOL 1033  OR completion of ESOL 0041  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0042  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0043  with a grade of C or higher; AND Arithmetic placement score of 64 or higher or elementary algebra placement score of 76 or higher or minimum placement score/ACT score placement into MATH 0070  or above or completion of MATH 0030  or MATH 0060  with a grade of C or higher AND instructor consent. We strongly encourage students who score below 64 to meet with an advisor or counselor to discuss their review and course options PRIOR to Math placement retesting or registering for a MATH course.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Starting system components and functions
    2. Starter components and functions
    3. Starting Circuits G.M. Ford Chrysler
    4. Starting system operation
    5. Safety precautions relating to starting system testing
    6. Test Procedures
      1. Battery
      2. Starter Draw
      3. Voltage Drop
      4. Control Circuit
    7. Interpret Test Results
    8. Charging system components and functions
    9. Alternator components and functions
    10. Charging system circuits Input Circuit A and B Output
    11. Alternator operation
    12. Safety precautions relating to charging system testing
    13. Test procedures
    14. Interpret test results
    15. Diagnose and repair starting and charging systems
    16. Perform NATEF tasks during shop times

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. identify safety precautions related to this course.
    2. develop an operational knowledge of starting and charging systems.
    3. perform complete tests on starting and charging systems.
    4. interpret test results on starting and charging systems.
    5. diagnose and repair starting and charging systems.
    6. perform NATEF tasks related to starting and charging systems.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    AST 1095 - Automatic Transmissions

    Credits: 4
    Hours/Week: Lecture 1 Lab 6
    Course Description: This course covers automatic transmission theory, sub-assembly operation, and operational controls. Rebuilding techniques, service procedures and diagnosis are covered in group discussions and shop applications. Students must be able to perform physical tasks to complete course requirements. This course requires completion of or to be concurrently enrolled in AST 1005 , AST 1055 , AST 1065 , AST 1075 , and AST 1085 .
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): Course placement into ENGL 0950  and RDNG 0950  or above OR completion of RDNG 0940  with a grade of C or higher OR course placement into ESOL 0051  and ESOL 0052  and ESOL 1033  OR completion of ESOL 0041  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0042  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0043  with a grade of C or higher; AND Arithmetic placement score of 64 or higher or elementary algebra placement score of 76 or higher or minimum placement score/ACT score placement into MATH 0070  or above or completion of MATH 0030  or MATH 0060  with a grade of C or higher AND instructor consent. We strongly encourage students who score below 64 to meet with an advisor or counselor to discuss their review and course options PRIOR to Math placement retesting or registering for a MATH course.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Automatic transaxle service procedures
    2. Automatic transaxle fluid
    3. Automatic transaxle removal and installation procedures
    4. Automatic transaxle components
    5. Planetary gear operation and theory
    6. Torque converter operation and theory
    7. Transmission holding devices
    8. Power Flow
    9. Valve body-hydraulics
    10. Transaxle disassembly procedures
    11. Subassembly rebuild procedures
    12. Adjustments and end play measurements
    13. Transaxle reassembly procedures
    14. Transaxle mounting and testing on transmission dyno
    15. Transaxle pressure testing in vehicle
    16. Transaxle stall testing
    17. Diagnose transaxle problems using a scan tool
    18. Perform NATEF tasks during shop and lab times.

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. identify safety procedures and precautions related to automatic transmissions.
    2. perform rebuild procedures.
    3. reassemble an automatic transaxle.
    4. test automatic transaxles.
    5. service an automatic transaxle
    6. remove and replace an automatic transaxle
    7. identify automatic transaxle components and their functions.
    8. identify all eight gear ratios available in a simple planetary gear set.
    9. describe torque converter operation and theory
    10. identify power flow for each gear position
    11. identify valve body operation and hydraulic circuits.
    12. disassemble an automatic transaxle.
    13. perform transaxle adjustments.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    AST 1105 - Automotive Service Technology

    Credits: 1
    Hours/Week: Lecture .5 Lab .5
    Course Description: This hands-on course introduces students to the theory and practice of tire, wheel, and Tire Pressure Monitoring System (TPMS) service. Topics include the operation of basic and advanced tire mounting and balancing equipment; TPMS reset, service, and diagnostic procedures; and punctured tire repair. Students must be able to perform physical tasks to complete course requirements.
    Prerequisite(s): * Course placement into ENGL 0950 and RDNG 0950 or above OR completion of RDNG 0940 with a grade of C or higher OR course placement into ESOL 0051 and ESOL 0052 and ESOL 1033 OR completion of ESOL 0041 with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0042 with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0043 with a grade of C or higher; AND

    * Permission of instructor.
    Corequisite(s): Concurrent enrollment in AST 1055, AST 1065, AST 1075, and AST 1085 OR AST 1015, AST 1025, AST 1035, and AST 1045.
    Major Content
    1. Safety procedures and precautions related to tire servicing and repair

    2. Tire types and ratings

    3. Basic and advanced tire mounting and balancing procedures

    4. Tire Pressure Monitoring System service and repair procedures

    5. Punctured tire repair
    Learning Outcomes
    1. identify safety procedures and precautions related to tire servicing and repair.

    2. identify and understand different tire types and ratings.

    3. perform proper mounting procedures for standard, low-profile, and run-flat tires.

    4. perform proper wheel balancing procedures using both conventional and road force wheel balancers.

    5. repair punctured tires following US Tire Manufacturer’s Association guidelines.

    6. reset, service, and diagnose Tire Pressure Monitoring Systems (TPMS).
    Competency 1 (1-6)
    Critical thinking- During this course students diagnose problems on vehicles while having to consider multiple variables in order to correctly assess the problem. Using worksheets, students document their thought processes and decisions during the diagnosis. These worksheets are turned in, evaluated, and discussed.


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    AST 2005 - Automotive Engines

    Credits: 4
    Hours/Week: Lecture 2 Lab 4
    Course Description: This course covers engine construction, operating theory and overhaul procedures. All engine subsystems will be studied in great detail. A complete engine overhaul on a component engine will be performed. Students must be able to perform physical tasks to complete course requirements.
     
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): AST 1005 , AST 1015 , AST 1025 , AST 1035  , AST 1045  , AST 1055 , AST 1065 , AST 1075 , AST 1085 , and AST 1095  and instructor consent.


     
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content

    1. Engine theory
    2. Sub Systems
    3. Engine Overhaul Techniques
    4. Calculations
    5. NATEF Tasks
    6. Safety

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. describe safety precautions associated with course.
    2. identify engine components.
    3. describe the operational theory of a four-stroke gasoline engine.
    4. describe cooling and lubrication system operation.
    5. describe engine disassembly and assembly procedures.
    6. measure components accurately using precision tools.
    7. perform fastener identification.
    8. perform NATEF tasks when completing an engine overhaul.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    AST 2015 - Engine Diagnosis

    Credits: 3
    Hours/Week: Lecture 2 Lab 2
    Course Description: This course covers the diagnostic test procedures used to determine the operating condition of a gasoline engine. Diagnostic testing and test interpretation will be performed. Students must be able to perform physical tasks to complete course requirements.
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): AST 2005  and instructor consent.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Engine theory
    2. Engine Noise Diagnosis
    3. Visual Inspection
    4. Interpretation of Test Results
    5. NATEF Tasks
    6. Safety

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. describe safety precautions associated with course.
    2. perform engine condition diagnostic tests.
    3. describe various engine noises.
    4. locate various engine noises.
    5. locate engine oil leaks.
    6. interpret diagnostic test results.
    7. perform NATEF tasks during engine diagnostic testing.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    AST 2025 - Cooling System Service

    Credits: 2
    Hours/Week: Lecture 1 Lab 2
    Course Description: This course covers the operation and service of the cooling system. Cooling system service and coolant recovery/recycling procedures will be performed. Students must be able to perform physical tasks to complete course requirements.
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): AST 2015  and instructor consent.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Cooling System Theory
    2. Coolants
    3. Belts and Hoses
    4. Block Heaters
    5. System Service
    6. Coolant Recovery/Recycling
    7. NATEF Tasks
    8. Safety

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. describe safety precautions.
    2. identify cooling system components.
    3. describe the cooling system operational theory.
    4. perform cooling systems service procedures.
    5. perform cooling system inspection and maintenance.
    6. perform coolant exchange using service equipment.
    7. describe coolant recycling procedures.
    8. perform NATEF tasks during cooling system service.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    AST 2035 - Emission Control

    Credits: 3
    Hours/Week: Lecture 2 Lab 2
    Course Description: This course covers the need for vehicle emission control. A complete description of the function and operation of most common emission control devices will be addressed. Testing of emission control devices will be performed. Students must be able to perform physical tasks to complete course requirements.
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): AST 2025  and instructor consent.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Identify need for Emission Control
    2. OBD II
    3. Exhaust Gas Composition
    4. Component/System Testing
    5. Diagnostics/ Monitors
    6. Legal Issues
    7. Emission Warranties
    8. NATEF Tasks
    9. Safety

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. describe the safety precautions associated with course. .
    2. describe the need for emission control.
    3. describe OBD II standardization and requirements.
    4. describe OBD II Diagnostics/ Monitors.
    5. describe MIL operation.
    6. test emission control components using Scan Tool.
    7. identify defective emission control components.
    8. describe legal issues concerning emission control tampering.
    9. perform NATEF tasks during emission component testing.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    AST 2045 - Computerized Engine Control

    Credits: 4
    Hours/Week: Lecture 2 Lab 4
    Course Description: This course covers the fundamentals of the microcomputer system used to control the automotive engine. Concepts covered include: central processing, memory/storage devices, input/output devices, adaptive strategy, and on-board diagnostics. Computer scanners will be used to test and analyze the engine control computer system. Students must be able to perform physical tasks to complete course requirements.
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): AST 2035  and instructor consent.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Overview of computerized engine control
    2. Actuators or Outputs
      1. Solenoids
      2. Relays
      3. Motors
      4. LightBulbs
      5. Generator Field
      6. Coil on Plug
    3. Sensors or Inputs
      1. Thermistors
      2. Potentiometers
      3. Rheostats
      4. Switches
      5. Pressure sensors
      6. Piezo electric devices
      7. Oxygen sensors
      8. Position sensors
    4. Computer Components
      1. Microprocessor
      2. RAM
      3. ROM
      4. EEPROM
      5. Clock F. High/Low side drivers
    5. Data Stream
      1. Communications protocol
      2. Bit
      3. Byte
      4. Baud Rate
      5. Can Bus
    6. Software updates
      1. Reflashing Modules
    7. Computer Scan Tools
      1. Practice using various scan tools to diagnose problems
    8. NATEF Tasks
      1. Completion of NATEF tasks associated with course.
    9. Safety
      1. General Shop
      2. Precautions relative to course.

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. describe safety precautions associated with course. describe the operation of a computerized engine control system. identify computer inputs and outputs. interpret computerized engine control wiring diagrams. locate computer system components. identify common computer electronic components. identify the diagnostic functions of a typical scan tool. interpret computer data using a scan tool. test sensors and actuators circuits. perform NATEF tasks when testing engine control computer systems.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    AST 2055 - Electronic Fuel Injection

    Credits: 2
    Hours/Week: Lecture 1 Lab 2
    Course Description: This course covers the operation and service of electronic fuel injection systems. System testing and necessary repairs will be performed. Students must be able to perform physical tasks to complete course requirements.
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): AST 2045  and instructor consent.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Benefits of fuel injection
    2. Intake Manifolds
    3. Types of fuel systems
    4. Fuel system components
    5. Fuel pressure regulation
    6. Fuel pressure and component testing
    7. Idle speed control
    8. Safety

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. describe safety precautions associated with course.
    2. identify fuel system components.
    3. locate fuel system components.
    4. perform fuel pressure testing.
    5. test fuel system components.
    6. diagnose fuel injection problems.
    7. replace defective components.
    8. perform NATEF tasks during fuel system testing completing

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    AST 2065 - Engine Performance Maintenance

    Credits: 4
    Hours/Week: Lecture 2 Lab 4
    Course Description: This course covers ignition system theory, testing and repair procedures, four-gas analysis and engine performance maintenance. Engine performance maintenance using a variety of diagnostic test equipment will be performed. Students must be able to perform physical tasks to complete course requirements.
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): AST 2055  and instructor consent.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Ignition system components and functions
    2. Distributor ignition system components
    3. Ignition system theory and operation
    4. Electronic ignition system components
    5. Test Equipment Use
    6. Test result interpretation
    7. Engine Maintenance Procedures
    8. Safety

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. describe safety precautions associated with course.
    2. operate engine performance test equipment.
    3. perform engine performance tests.
    4. interpret engine performance test results.
    5. perform engine performance maintenance.
    6. perform NATEF tasks during engine performance maintenance.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    AST 2075 - Supplemental Computer Systems

    Credits: 2
    Hours/Week: Lecture 1 Lab 2
    Course Description: In this course, students will study supplemental computer systems used to control inflatable restraint systems. Repair and diagnostic procedures will be performed on live vehicles. Students must be able to perform physical tasks to complete course requirements.
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): AST 2065  and instructor consent.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Inflatable restraint system components
    2. Inflatable restraint system operation
    3. Inflatable restraint system test
    4. Interpret test results
    5. Completion of NATEF tasks associated with course
    6. Safety
    7. Safety precautions and procedures

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. describe the safety precautions associated with course.
    2. perform diagnostic tests inflatable restraint systems.
    3. interpret diagnostic test results.
    4. perform repair procedures on supplemental computer systems.
    5. perform NATEF tasks applicable to course.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    AST 2085 - Air Conditioning

    Credits: 3
    Hours/Week: Lecture 2 Lab 2
    Course Description: This course covers the fundamentals and service of the automotive air conditioning system. Topics include system operation, recovery/recycling of 134A, system charging, leak detection, performance testing, and retrofitting. Air conditioning service using typical service equipment will be performed. Students must be able to perform physical tasks to complete course requirements.
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): AST 2075  and instructor consent.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Operational theory
    2. Component replacement
    3. Service procedures
    4. Service equipment
    5. Retrofitting
    6. ASE recovery/recycling certification
    7. Completion of NATEF tasks associated with course
    8. Safety

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. describe safety precautions associated with course.
    2. identify air conditioning system components.
    3. describe the operational theory of an air conditioning system.
    4. perform air conditioning service using typical service equipment.
    5. perform recovery/recycling procedures.
    6. diagnose typical air conditioning problems.
    7. describe retrofit procedures.
    8. perform NATEF tasks during air conditioning service

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    AST 2095 - New Automotive Technology

    Credits: 3
    Hours/Week: Lecture 2 Lab 2
    Course Description: This course introduces students to new technology in the automotive industry. Course content will range from shop management trends to new federally mandated systems that are and will be required on vehicles. Course content will change as vehicle technologies emerge. Students must be able to perform physical tasks to complete course requirements.
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): AST 1005 , AST 1085 , AST 1095 , AST 1015 , AST 1045 , AST 1085 , and AST 1095  and instructor consent.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. New Technology
    2. Federally mandated systems
    3. Shop management trends
    4. Future industry trends
    5. Future technology

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. describe new automotive technology that is not covered in our current curriculum.
    2. discuss future trends in the automotive area.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration


Biology

  
  •  

    BIOL 1010 - Biological Foundations of Biofabrication

    Credits: 3
    Hours/Week: Lecture 3 Lab None
    Course Description: This course introduces students without a biology background to basic biological concepts required to succeed in subsequent courses for the biofabrication certificate.  The course provides a working understanding of the scientific method, proper use of biological laboratory equipment including microscopes, pipettes, and bioprinter, principles of biochemistry, properties of biological molecules, cell and tissue structure, and cells used to 3D print biological material.  The course includes hands-on projects applying the biological principles learned to the field of biofabrication.
    MnTC Goals
    None

    Prerequisite(s): Course placement into college-level English and Reading OR completion of ENGL 0950  with a grade of C or higher OR completion of RDNG 0940  with a grade of C or higher and qualifying English Placement Exam OR completion of RDNG 0950  with a grade of C or higher and ENGL 0090  with a grade of C or higher OR completion of ESOL 0051  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0052  with a grade of C or higher.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Process of science to answer questions related to biofabrication.
    2. Characteristics of strong experimental design, including identification and control of variables that affect the process of biofabrication.
    3. Proper light microscope and pipetting technique used in examining cells and creating cell cultures and bioinks.
    4. Importance of water and buffers in cell culture and biofabrication.
    5. Polymers and properties of biological molecules as related to bioinks.
    6. Basic cell structure and organelles of the cell
    7. Cell transport mechanisms including diffusion/osmosis that constrain biofabricated constructs.
    8. Cell reproduction as related to biofabrication.
    9. Energy metabolism in cells as it pertains to survival of biofabricated constructs.

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course, students will be able to:

    1. develop a well-designed experiment to answer a scientific question related to biofabrication.
    2. make data-driven decisions related to the process of biofabrication.
    3. properly utilize microscope and other equipment to perform experiments and gather data, and differentiate between major cell types and structures as required in biofabrication.
    4. describe the basic structure and properties of matter as they pertain to the molecules that make up the cells utilized in biofabrication.
    5. apply knowledge of basic cell structure and the functions cells perform to reproduce and maintain homeostasis to problems related to viability of bioprinted cells.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    None
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    BIOL 1020 - Biology Concepts

    Credits: 4
    Hours/Week: Lecture 3 Lab 2
    Course Description: This is a lab science course dealing with the basic concepts of general biology including cell biology, energy capture and utilization, heredity, origin and descent of life, classification of organisms, and environmental relationships of living things. Laboratory experiences are provided to acquaint students with basic lab methods and techniques.
    MnTC Goals
    3 Natural Science

    Prerequisite(s): Course placement into college-level English and Reading OR completion of ENGL 0950  with a grade of C or higher OR completion of RDNG 0940  with a grade of C or higher and qualifying English Placement Exam OR completion of RDNG 0950  with a grade of C or higher and ENGL 0090  with a grade of C or higher OR completion of ESOL 0051  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0052  with a grade of C or higher.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: High school chemistry or CHEM 1020  or equivalent.

    Major Content
    1. Characteristics of life
    2. Organization of life Evolution
    3. Food chains and food webs
    4. Harvest of energy to sustain life
    5. Reproduction
    6. Heredity
    7. Evolution

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate understanding of the scientific method, scientific inquiry, and development of scientific theories.
    2. Discuss how biology can be a way of seeking knowledge about oneself and ones place in nature.
    3. Demonstrate a mastery of biological concepts and principles, biological vocabulary, and biological laws and theories.
    4. Explain the basic concepts and functions of biological systems.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    03. 01. Demonstrate understanding of scientific theories.
    03. 02. Formulate and test hypotheses by performing laboratory, simulation, or field experiments in at least two of the natural science disciplines. One of these experimental components should develop, in greater depth, students’ laboratory experience in the collection of data, its statistical and graphical analysis, and an appreciation of its sources of error and uncertainty. 03. 03. Communicate their experimental findings, analyses, and interpretations both orally and in writing.


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    BIOL 1021 - Biology of Women

    Credits: 3
    Hours/Week: Lecture 3 Lab None
    Course Description: This course investigates male and female reproductive anatomy and physiology, the basis of scientific inquiry and investigation, analysis of scientific data, and sexual and reproductive biology of women and men including contraception, pregnancy, childbirth, and infertility. The biology of cancers, sexually transmitted diseases and infections, and systemic chronic diseases throughout the lifespan is also included. Lab-like experiences and simulations are part of the course. Course is open to both women and men.
    MnTC Goals
    3 Natural Science

    Prerequisite(s): Course placement into college-level English and Reading OR completion of ENGL 0950  with a grade of C or higher OR completion of RDNG 0940  with a grade of C or higher and qualifying English Placement Exam OR completion of RDNG 0950  with a grade of C or higher and ENGL 0090  with a grade of C or higher OR completion of ESOL 0051  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0052  with a grade of C or higher.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: High school biology or BIOL 1020  

    Major Content
    1. How science works. The scientific method of inquiry and investigation.
    2. The development of scientific theories
    3. Sexual and reproductive dimensions of womens and mens health.
    4. The reproductive anatomy and physiology of women and men, including development throughout the lifespan
    5. Biologic basis of sexually transmitted diseases and infections
    6. Physiology and treatment of various menstrual disorders
    7. Anatomy and physiology of pregnancy, childbirth, and infertility
    8. Action and physiology of various contraceptive methods, their actions, effectiveness, and epidemiology
    9. Understanding the biologic basis for and the prevention of cancers and systemic chronic diseases throughout the female lifespan

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. demonstrate understanding of the scientific method, scientific inquiry, and development of scientific theories.
    2. explain sexual and reproductive anatomy and physiology of women and men.
    3. analyze various contraceptive methods, their action, effectiveness, and epidemiology.
    4. describe the stages of pregnancy and childbirth.
    5. analyze and explain womens and mens reproductive health diseases or issues; including infertility, cancers, sexually transmitted diseases and infections.
    6. analyze societal issues of biology which are specific to women or men.
    7. evaluate evidence presented as it pertains to gender-specific biological issues; make informed judgments about these issues.
    8. analyze a set of data and make valid conclusions concerning the data.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    03. 01. Demonstrate understanding of scientific theories.
    03. 03. Communicate their experimental findings, analyses, and interpretations both orally and in writing.
    03. 04. Evaluate societal issues from a natural science perspective, ask questions about the evidence presented, and make informed judgments about science-related topics and policies.


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    BIOL 1022 - Human Biology Lab

    Credits: 1
    Hours/Week: Lecture None Lab 1
    Course Description: This course is an applied lab focused on the human organ systems and designed to supplement learning in BIOL 1024, which is a survey of the human organ systems by structure and function. Organ systems include integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive. The scientific method of inquiry, human reproduction, development, and heredity are other topics integrated into the biology of the human body. This course is designed for students who wish to gain a better understanding of the biology of the human body, including liberal arts majors.
    MnTC Goals
    3 Natural Science

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 1024  or concurrently enrolled.
    Note: Students concurrently enrolled in prerequisite course must contact Records Office for verification.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Histology: Tissue form, function, and organization
    2. Form, function, and diseases associated with human organ systems listed below:
    3. Integumentary system: the skin and its derivatives for protection
    4. The scientific method of inquiry and investigation and the development of scientific theories from information gained by using the scientific method
    5. Skeletal system: the bones, cartilage, ligaments, and other tissues for structure and support
    6. Cardiovascular system: the heart, blood vessels, and blood for transportation
    7. Digestive system: the gastrointestinal tract and associated digestive organs for nutrition and waste removal
    8. Endocrine system: the glands of internal secretion and hormone products for chemical regulation
    9. Lymphatic system: the lymphatic organs for collection and cleansing of interstitial fluid and mechanisms for defense against disease (immunity)
    10. Muscular system: the muscles, tendons, and other tissues for locomotion
    11. Nervous system: the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord) and the peripheral nervous system for responsiveness, communication
    12. Respiratory system: the lungs, bronchial tubes, and related structures for gas exchange
    13. Sensory mechanisms: somatic receptors to collect sensory information from the body and special senses that allow for smell, taste, sight, hearing, and equilibrium
    14. Urinary system: the kidneys and associated structures for excretion
    15. Reproductive system: the gonads, ducts, and accessory structures for sexual reproduction, development, and heredity

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course, students will be able to:

    1. explain the relationship between form and function of human organ systems.
    2. describe how human organ systems integrate for overall form and function.
    3. describe how various diseases affect human organ systems function and overall body function.
    4. explain relevant scientific theories.
    5. explain the methods of scientific inquiry.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    03. 01. Demonstrate understanding of scientific theories.
    03. 02. Formulate and test hypotheses by performing laboratory, simulation, or field experiments in at least two of the natural science disciplines.  One of these experimental components should develop, in greater depth, students’ laboratory experience in the collection of data, its statistical and graphical analysis, and an appreciation of its sources of error and uncertainty.
    03. 04. Evaluate societal issues from a natural science perspective, ask questions about the evidence presented, and make informed judgments about science-related topics and policies.
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    None


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    BIOL 1023 - Introduction to Forensic Biology

    Credits: 4
    Hours/Week: Lecture 3 Lab 2
    Course Description: This course deals with many of the basic concepts of general and human biology and chemistry, including a survey of various areas of forensic biology. Topics include DNA structure and analysis, analysis of skeletal evidence, biological trace evidence, blood and other body fluids, fingerprinting, and an overview of the human organ systems connected to these kinds of evidence.
    MnTC Goals
    3 Natural Science

    Prerequisite(s): Course placement into college-level English and Reading OR completion of ENGL 0950  with a grade of C or higher OR completion of RDNG 0940  with a grade of C or higher and qualifying English Placement Exam OR completion of RDNG 0950  with a grade of C or higher and ENGL 0090  with a grade of C or higher OR completion of ESOL 0051  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0052  with a grade of C or higher.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Structure and function of organic molecules
    2. Properties of water
    3. Structure and function of cells
    4. Cellular reproduction
    5. Definition of science, biology, and forensic science
    6. History of the development of biology and forensic science
    7. Characteristics of tissues, hairs, DNA
    8. Other methodologies as they arise in the field(s)

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. Describe the historic development of biology and forensic science.
    2. Demonstrate the proper use of a compound microscope, stereomicroscope, and awareness of the principles of other types of microscopes including comparison, phase contrast, and electron microscopes.
    3. Analyze the applications of science in society, e.g., the application of the scientific method to our daily lives as well as to the legal system (such as understanding the biology of and validity DNA in medical and legal proceedings).
    4. Explain how to collect and preserve biological materials for scientific investigation.
    5. Describe the physiological effects of various environmental and chemical agents, including disease-causing organisms, toxins, poison, medications, and illicit drugs.
    6. Identify basic concepts of biology and chemistry, especially as they apply to the human body, including cell structure and function, biology of and analysis of DNA, and biological properties of blood and other body fluids.
    7. describe selected principles that have been developed through the work of relevant scientists.
    8. describe the structures and functions of the basic tissue types and of each of the body’s organs and organ systems.
    9. explain cellular reproduction, including cell division, the genetic code, DNA replication, and protein synthesis.
    10. explain the basic structure and function of human organ systems.
    11. explain the methods of scientific inquiry.
    12. explain changes that occur in biological systems as they decompose and factors that affect decomposition.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    03. 01. Demonstrate understanding of scientific theories.
    03. 02. Formulate and test hypotheses by performing laboratory, simulation, or field experiments in at least two of the natural science disciplines. One of these experimental components should develop, in greater depth, students’ laboratory experience in the collection of data, its statistical and graphical analysis, and an appreciation of its sources of error and uncertainty. 03. 03. Communicate their experimental findings, analyses, and interpretations both orally and in writing.
    03. 04. Evaluate societal issues from a natural science perspective, ask questions about the evidence presented, and make informed judgments about science-related topics and policies.


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    BIOL 1024 - Human Biology

    Credits: 3
    Hours/Week: Lecture 3 Lab None
    Course Description: This course is a survey of the human organ systems by structure and function. Organ systems include integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive. The scientific method of inquiry, human reproduction, development, and heredity are other topics integrated into the biology of the human body. This course is designed for students who wish to gain a better understanding of the biology of the human body, including liberal arts majors. This course will include lab-like experiences.
    MnTC Goals
    3 Natural Science

    Prerequisite(s): Course placement into college-level English and Reading OR completion of ENGL 0950  with a grade of C or higher OR completion of RDNG 0940  with a grade of C or higher and qualifying English Placement Exam OR completion of RDNG 0950  with a grade of C or higher and ENGL 0090  with a grade of C or higher OR completion of ESOL 0051  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0052  with a grade of C or higher. 
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: High school biology or BIOL 1020  

    Major Content
    1. Histology: Tissue form, function, and organization
    2. Form, function, and diseases associated with human organ systems listed below:
    3. Integumentary system: the skin and its derivatives for protection
    4. The scientific method of inquiry and investigation and the development of scientific theories from information gained by using the scientific method
    5. Skeletal system: the bones, cartilage, ligaments, and other tissues for structure and support
    6. Cardiovascular system: the heart, blood vessels, and blood for transportation
    7. Digestive system: the gastrointestinal tract and associated digestive organs for nutrition and waste removal
    8. Endocrine system: the glands of internal secretion and hormone products for chemical regulation
    9. Lymphatic system: the lymphatic organs for collection and cleansing of interstitial fluid and mechanisms for defense against disease (immunity)
    10. Muscular system: the muscles, tendons, and other tissues for locomotion
    11. Nervous system: the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord) and the peripheral nervous system for responsiveness, communication
    12. Respiratory system: the lungs, bronchial tubes, and related structures for gas exchange
    13. Sensory mechanisms: somatic receptors to collect sensory information from the body and special senses that allow for smell, taste, sight, hearing, and equilibrium
    14. Urinary system: the kidneys and associated structures for excretion
    15. Reproductive system: the gonads, ducts, and accessory structures for sexual reproduction, development, and heredity

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. explain the relationship between form and function of human organ systems.
    2. describe how human organ systems integrate for overall form and function.
    3. describe how various diseases affect human organ systems function and overall body function.
    4. explain relevant scientific theories
    5. explain the methods of scientific inquiry.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    03. 01. Demonstrate understanding of scientific theories.
    03. 03. Communicate their experimental findings, analyses, and interpretations both orally and in writing.
    03. 04. Evaluate societal issues from a natural science perspective, ask questions about the evidence presented, and make informed judgments about science-related topics and policies.


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    BIOL 1025 - Field Biology

    Credits: 4
    Hours/Week: Lecture 3 Lab 2
    Course Description: This is a lab science course dealing with interrelationships between environmental influences and organisms as well as surveying flora and fauna. Concerns considered include climate change, ozone depletion, ground water contamination, acid rain, and hazardous waste disposal. This is an experience-centered course in which students have the opportunity to learn fundamental environmental principles, basic concepts of biology, and conservation through integrated laboratory and lecture presentation and field work. This is a lab science general education course.
    MnTC Goals
    3 Natural Science, 10 People/Environment

    Prerequisite(s): Course placement into college-level English and Reading OR completion of ENGL 0950  with a grade of C or higher OR completion of RDNG 0940  with a grade of C or higher and qualifying English Placement Exam OR completion of RDNG 0950  with a grade of C or higher and ENGL 0090  with a grade of C or higher OR completion of ESOL 0051  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0052  with a grade of C or higher.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: High school biology or BIOL 1020  or equivalent.

    Major Content
    1. Environmental problems
    2. Ecological principles
    3. Biodiversity
    4. Natural resources
    5. Pollution
    6. Sustainability

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. Explain relationships between the plant and animal world and the influence of the environment on all levels of plant and animal organization.
    2. Discuss the principles and techniques of systematics using flora and fauna and the principles governing distribution of organisms
    3. Explain changes of living things through time, e.g., ecological succession.
    4. Describe attitudes which lead to constructive action on social and economic problems of wide concern, e.g., conservation.
    5. Discuss ones place in the total picture and health of the natural world.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    03. 01. Demonstrate understanding of scientific theories.
    03. 03. Communicate their experimental findings, analyses, and interpretations both orally and in writing.
    03. 04. Evaluate societal issues from a natural science perspective, ask questions about the evidence presented, and make informed judgments about science-related topics and policies.
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    10. 01. Explain the basic structure and function of various natural ecosystems and of human adaptive strategies within those systems.
    10. 02. Discern patterns and interrelationships of bio-physical and socio-cultural systems.
    10. 04. Evaluate critically environmental and natural resource issues in light of understandings about interrelationships, ecosystems, and institutions.
    10. 05. Propose and assess alternative solutions to environmental problems.


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    BIOL 1027 - Climate Change Biology

    Credits: 3
    Hours/Week: Lecture 3 Lab None
    Course Description: This course deals with the effects of climate change on various biological species and ecosystems. Topics include basic biology concepts including characteristics and organization of life, ecosystems, biogeochemical cycles, basic climate change science, and how various organisms are responding to it. Students will form eco-teams”, a type of non-traditional lab component to the course, in which they will calculate their carbon footprints and analyze and determine ways to decrease their environmental impact. Students will explore practical ways to live more sustainably and how to be responsible citizens in regard to sustainability; all of which can improve one’s quality of life, slow climate change, and help protect present and future generations of humans and other species.
    MnTC Goals
    3 Natural Science, 10 People/Environment

    Prerequisite(s): Course placement into college-level English and Reading OR completion of ENGL 0950  with a grade of C or higher OR completion of RDNG 0940  with a grade of C or higher and qualifying English Placement Exam OR completion of RDNG 0950  with a grade of C or higher and ENGL 0090  with a grade of C or higher OR completion of ESOL 0051  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0052  with a grade of C or higher.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Organization of life
    2. Characteristics of life
    3. Energy of life (cellular respiration, photosynthesis)
    4. Ecosystems
    5. Biogeochemical cycles
    6. Greenhouse effect, natural versus enhanced
    7. Carbon footprint
    8. Basic science of climate change
    9. Effects of climate change on biodiversity in general and on selected species and ecosystems (e.g., species range shifts, ocean chemistry changes, sea level changes, freshwater changes, changes in pests and pathogens, endangerment and extinctions)
    10. Responses of species to climate change, including species native to Minnesota
    11. Sustainable living
    12. International policy and collaboration for solutions
    13. Practical (and not so practical) ways to live more sustainably
    14. Group and individual planning, taking planned actions, and assessing resulting decrease in individual environmental impact

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. explain the basic organization of biology. (atoms, molecules, cells, tissues, organs, organisms, populations, communities, ecosystems, biosphere)
    2. describe the effects of climate change on living organisms and ecosystems
    3. explain relationships between climate change and agriculture, deforestation, burning of fossil fuels, and human population growth
    4. apply several aspects of sustainable living to one’s personal life through working as part of an Eco-Team.
    5. explain how our culture needs to shift its assumptions about what a good quality of life really is and how to influence and help bring about changes needed to bring about this shift
    6. assess the consequences of global environmental change for people, for ecosystems, and for the biosphere
    7. explain the importance of ones place in the total picture and health of the natural world and of society
    8. explain the basic biogeochemical cycles
    9. describe the major ecosystems
    10. calculate individual carbon dioxide equivalents emissions (carbon footprint)
    11. develop and implement plans to reduce carbon footprint
    12. explain the difference between the natural greenhouse effect and the enhanced (anthropogenic) carbon cycle
    13. explain the basic characteristics of life

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    03. 01. Demonstrate understanding of scientific theories.
    03. 03. Communicate their experimental findings, analyses, and interpretations both orally and in writing.
    03. 04. Evaluate societal issues from a natural science perspective, ask questions about the evidence presented, and make informed judgments about science-related topics and policies.
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    10. 02. Discern patterns and interrelationships of bio-physical and socio-cultural systems.
    10. 03. Describe the basic institutional arrangements (social, legal, political, economic, religious) that are evolving to deal with environmental and natural resource challenges.
    10. 05. Propose and assess alternative solutions to environmental problems.
    10. 06. Articulate and defend the actions they would take on various environmental issues.


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    BIOL 1029 - Microbes and Society: An Introduction to Microbiology

    Credits: 4
    Hours/Week: Lecture 3 Lab 2
    Course Description: This course introduces students to the biology of the major microbial groups, their role in our everyday existence, and the methods of scientific inquiry. The lecture provides a global, cultural, and societal perspective on the roles microorganisms play in human civilizations. Contemporary topics, such as genetic engineering, bioterrorism, antibiotic resistance, biotechnology, emerging infectious diseases, and the consequences of public policies on the emergence, spread, and control of infectious disease will be examined. The laboratory will acquaint students with basic techniques used in the handling of microorganisms, and investigate the properties and uses of microbes. This course is intended for students who require a laboratory science course to fulfill general education or degree requirements. This course is not intended for students who require a microbiology course for Nursing, Pharmacy, Dental Hygiene or other allied health programs. Prerequisite(s): Assessment score placement in RDNG 1000 or completion of RDNG 0900 or RDNG 0950 with a grade of C or higher.
    MnTC Goals
    3 Natural Science, 10 People/Environment

    Prerequisite(s): Course placement into college-level English and Reading OR completion of ENGL 0950  with a grade of C or higher OR completion of RDNG 0940  with a grade of C or higher and qualifying English Placement Exam OR completion of RDNG 0950  with a grade of C or higher and ENGL 0090  with a grade of C or higher OR completion of ESOL 0051  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0052  with a grade of C or higher.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content

    1. Historical roots of microbiology: 1600s to the present day
    2. Microbial classification systems, nomenclature, microscopy
    3. Bacteria: structure and physiology, important bacterial groups
    4. Viruses: structure, replication, role in cancer
    5. Prions: structure, mechanisms of disease causation
    6. Protists: amoebas, flagellates, ciliates, sporozoa, unicellular algae, slime molds, water molds
    7. Fungi: classification, structure, growth, beneficial types, pathogenic types
    8. Microbial growth and metabolism
    9. Microbial genetics: genomes, transcription, translation, genetic regulation, genetic mutations, genetic recombination, genetic engineering
    10. Control of microbes and infectious diseases: physical and chemical methods, and the legal, political, social and economic issues concerning antibiotic resistance and vaccines
    11. Cultural perspective on the use of microbes in food production: wine, vinegar, bread, cheese, olives, sausages, sauerkraut, soy sauce, pickles, beer, brandy, cocoa, chocolate, coffee, and others.
    12. Food safety and food preservation: food spoilage, methods of food preservation, programs for preventing foodborne disease
    13. Genomics: methodology, microbial genomes, Human Genome Project
    14. Biotechnology and industrial use of microbes throughout the world: pharmaceuticals, antibiotics, vaccines, DNA analysis and fingerprinting, enzymes, organic acids, vitamins, hormones, steroids.
    15. Microbes and global agriculture: nitrogen cycle, ruminant digestion, dairy production, insecticides, herbicides, genetically modified foods, food based vaccines.
    16. Microbes and the global ecosystem: biogeochemical cycles, water, sewage, and waste treatment, bioremediation, detection of microbial pollution
    17. Immunology: relationships between humans and microbes, establishment of disease, nonspecific resistance to disease, cell-mediated immunity, antibody-mediated immunity, hypersensitivities, vaccinations
    18. Viral, fungal, prion, protozoal, and bacterial diseases of humans
    19. Bioterrorism: history, categories, major microbes of interest, detection, and countermeasures
    20. Social, environmental and political factors contributing to the emergence and reemergence of infectious diseases
    21. Global, cultural, social, environmental and political factors contributing to the emergence and reemergence of infectious diseases and the evolving institutional arrangements
    22. Global, national and local efforts designed for emerging and reemerging infectious diseases: HIV and AIDS, prion diseases and transfer to humans, tuberculosis, and others
    23. General laboratory procedures and lab safety
    24. The scientific method and microbiology
    25. Use of the compound microscope
    26. Staining techniques
    27. Techniques for bacterial cultures: streak plates, broth cultures, agar slants.
    28. Characteristics of major bacterial groups such as Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, Bacillus, Lactobacillus, Clostridium
    29. Biochemical characteristics of bacteria and their use in the identification of unknown bacteria
    30. Evaluation of physical and chemical agents for controlling microbial growth
    31. Determining the sensitivity and resistance of bacteria to antibiotics
    32. Microbiology of foods: preservation, fermentation and plate counts
    33. Microbiology of dairy products: natural bacterial content of milk, preparation of yogurt
    34. Microbiology of water: detection of microbes, preparation of a biofilm
    35. Microbiology of soil: Isolation of bacteria from soil, antibiotic production from soil bacteria, microbial ecology in the soil
    36. Mutating bacterial genomes
    37. Immunological techniques for the determination of blood type and diagnosis of microbial diseases (simulation)
    38. Use of biotechnology based laboratory techniques for the identification of individuals infected with an agent used in a bioterrorism attack (simulation)

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. explain the methods of scientific inquiry, the scientific method, and the development of scientific theories.

    2. explain the structures, reproductive methods, and functions of bacteria, algae, viruses, protists, helminths, fungi, and prions.

    3. describe the central role of microbes in the functioning of earth’s ecosystems including their role in energy production, decomposition, and biogeochemical recycling.

    4. analyze the roles of microbes in food production, agriculture, industry, bioremediation, biotechnology, genetic engineering and biological research from a global, environmental and social perspective.

    5. interpret the effect of environmental conditions on the growth and control of microorganisms.

    6. describe the association of microbes with humans, the microbial mechanisms of disease, and the human response to microbial infections from a biological and public health viewpoint.

    7. analyze the global, cultural, social, environmental and political factors contributing to the emergence of infectious diseases.

    8. analyze the consequences of public policy decisions on environmental and human health and institutional arrangements that are evolving to deal with these challenges.

    9. demonstrate proper laboratory techniques in the handling of microorganisms.


    Competency 1 (1-6)
    03. 01. Demonstrate understanding of scientific theories.
    03. 02. Formulate and test hypotheses by performing laboratory, simulation, or field experiments in at least two of the natural science disciplines. One of these experimental components should develop, in greater depth, students’ laboratory experience in the collection of data, its statistical and graphical analysis, and an appreciation of its sources of error and uncertainty. 03. 04. Evaluate societal issues from a natural science perspective, ask questions about the evidence presented, and make informed judgments about science-related topics and policies.
    03. 04. Evaluate societal issues from a natural science perspective, ask questions about the evidence presented, and make informed judgments about science-related topics and policies.
    Competency 2 (7-10)
    10. 01. Explain the basic structure and function of various natural ecosystems and of human adaptive strategies within those systems.

    10. 02. Discern patterns and interrelationships of bio-physical and socio-cultural systems.

    10. 03. Describe the basic institutional arrangements (social, legal, political, economic, religious) that are evolving to deal with environmental and natural resource challenges.

    10. 04. Evaluate critically environmental and natural resource issues in light of understandings about interrelationships, ecosystems, and institutions.

    10. 05. Propose and assess alternative solutions to environmental problems.


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    BIOL 1033 - Introduction to Human Genetics

    Credits: 3
    Hours/Week: Lecture 3 Lab None
    Course Description: This introductory non-laboratory Biology course is designed to expose students to a wide range of topics surrounding genetics. Topics covered include: cell structure and function, cell reproduction, organismal reproduction, gene transfer, Mendelian genetics, mutations, and developmental genetics. Techniques used to study human genetics and reproduction will also be discussed. Ethical implications of gene manipulation will be interwoven throughout the course. This course will contain lab-like experiences although it is not a traditional lab course.
    MnTC Goals
    3 Natural Science

    Prerequisite(s): Course placement into college-level English and Reading OR completion of ENGL 0950  with a grade of C or higher OR completion of RDNG 0940  with a grade of C or higher and qualifying English Placement Exam OR completion of RDNG 0950  with a grade of C or higher and ENGL 0090  with a grade of C or higher OR completion of ESOL 0051  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0052  with a grade of C or higher.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: None

    Major Content
    1. Cell reproduction
    2. Cell structure and function
    3. Ethical implications of gene manipulation
    4. Genetic manipulation techniques
    5. Genetics of cancer
    6. Genetics of immunity
    7. How science ¿works¿
    8. Human Genome Project
    9. Human reproduction
    10. Mendelian inheritance
    11. Non-mendelian inheritance
    12. Pedigrees
    13. Population genetics
    14. Relationship between genetics and evolution
    15. Use of genetic data

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. explain the process of cell reproduction.
    2. describe basic cell structures and their functions.
    3. explain the genetics involved in immunity.
    4. describe basic gene manipulation techniques.
    5. explain the genetics involved in cancer.
    6. use basic genetic terminology.
    7. explain the implications of gene manipulation on individual, population, societal, and ecological levels.
    8. explain the process of organismal reproduction.
    9. explain Mendelian inheritance principles.
    10. describe non-Mendelian inheritance patterns.
    11. describe a pedigree.
    12. analyze human genetic data to determine probable inheritance patterns.

    Competency 1 (1-6)
    03. 01. Demonstrate understanding of scientific theories.
    03. 03. Communicate their experimental findings, analyses, and interpretations both orally and in writing.
    03. 04. Evaluate societal issues from a natural science perspective, ask questions about the evidence presented, and make informed judgments about science-related topics and policies.


    Courses and Registration

  
  •  

    BIOL 1041 - Principles of Biology I

    Credits: 5
    Hours/Week: Lecture 4 Lab 3
    Course Description: This is a lab science course that provides a general introduction to biological principles. Topics include basic chemistry, biological molecules, cell structure, metabolism, cell reproduction, molecular biology, genetics, and evolution. Laboratory exercises provide students the opportunity to better understand basic biological principles through scientific practice in hypothesis-development, experimental design, data collection and analysis.  Students will also gain experience with commonly-used biological instruments and equipment.  This laboratory science course is primarily intended for biology or biology-related majors, health-related pre-professionals, and other related liberal arts majors.
    MnTC Goals
    3 Natural Science

    Prerequisite(s): Course placement into college-level English and Reading OR completion of ENGL 0950  with a grade of C or higher OR completion of RDNG 0940  with a grade of C or higher and qualifying English Placement Exam OR completion of RDNG 0950  with a grade of C or higher and ENGL 0090  with a grade of C or higher OR completion of ESOL 0051  with a grade of C or higher and ESOL 0052  with a grade of C or higher. BIOL 1020  with a grade of C or higher OR CHEM 1020  or higher with a grade of C or higher OR one year each of High School Biology AND High School Chemistry with grades of C or higher within the last three years OR Instructor consent.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Recommendation: BIOL 1020  AND CHEM 1020  or higher, OR one year each of High School Biology AND High School Chemistry with grades of C or higher within the last three years.

    Major Content

    1. Introduction to Biology as a Science

    2. Scientific Inquiry and Investigation:  Hypothesis formation, Experimental Design, and Data Analysis

    3. Chemistry of Life:  Atoms, Bonding, Characteristics of Water and Macromolecules

    4. Cell Structure and Function: Cell theory, Prokaryotic vs. Eukaryotic, Plasma membrane, Nucleus, Cytoplasm and Organelles

    5. Enzymes and Cell Metabolism:  Energy Transformations, Enzyme structure and Function, ATP, Photosynthesis, and Cellular Respiration

    6. Cell Division:  Mitosis, Meiosis, and Control of Cell Division

    7. Molecular biology: Structure and Function of DNA, Protein Synthesis, DNA technology

    8. Genetics and Inheritance: Mendelian Rules, Punnett Squares, Pedigrees, Complex Inheritance Patterns

    9. Evolution: Theory and Evidence, Mechanisms of Microevolution, Macroevolution, Phylogenetic Inference


    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course students will be able to:

    1. explain basic principles of biochemistry, biological molecules, cell structure and organelle function, metabolism, genetics, and evolution.

    2. apply basic principles of biochemistry, cell structure and organelle function, metabolism, genetics, and evolution to specific situations.

    3. demonstrate understanding of major scientific theories in biology. 

    4. formulate and test hypotheses by designing and/or performing laboratory experiments that include data collection and interpretation, statistical analysis, graphical presentation of results, quantitative reasoning, and interpretation of sources of error and uncertainty.

    5. distinguish between primary and secondary scientific literature.

    6. identify characteristics of strong experimental design.

    7. analyze and interpret primary literature related to biology, including critique of experimental design.

    8. communicate experimental findings both orally and in writing.

    9. use the compound light microscope and other biological laboratory equipment within the context of laboratory investigations.


    Competency 1 (1-6)
    03. 01. Demonstrate understanding of scientific theories.
    03. 02. Formulate and test hypotheses by performing laboratory, simulation, or field experiments in at least two of the natural science disciplines. One of these experimental components should develop, in greater depth, students’ laboratory experience in the collection of data, its statistical and graphical analysis, and an appreciation of its sources of error and uncertainty. 03. 03. Communicate their experimental findings, analyses, and interpretations both orally and in writing.
    03. 04. Evaluate societal issues from a natural science perspective, ask questions about the evidence presented, and make informed judgments about science-related topics and policies.


    Courses and Registration

 

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