Feb 06, 2023  
2017-2018 Course Catalog 
    
2017-2018 Course Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

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PHIL 2051 - Philosophy of Religion

Credits: 3
Hours/Week: Lecture NoneLab None
Course Description: Religion is one of the most powerful forces that has influenced human identity and history. Philosophy of religion addresses what is believed by religious, non-religious, and anti-religious people and what grounds they have for their beliefs. Topics may include definitions of religion, characteristics of the ultimate reality, the role and limits of reason in religion, evil, life after death, and religious pluralism. This course will address such issues from both the Western and Eastern perspectives.
MnTC Goals
6 Humanities/Fine Arts, 8 Global Perspective

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1021  with a grade of C or higher.
Corequisite(s): None
Recommendation: PHIL 1051  or PHIL 1025  or another PHIL course.

Major Content
  1. Arguments regarding the existence of ultimate reality
  2. Characterizing ultimate reality
  3. Life after death
  4. New issues in the philosophy of religion
  5. Religious pluralism
  6. The academic v. devotional study of religion
  7. The problem of evil
  8. The role of reason in religion
  9. What is philosophy of religion

Learning Outcomes
At the end of this course students will be able to:

  1. analyze the concept of evil.
  2. analyze the concept of ultimate reality.
  3. evaluate arguments for the existence or non-existence of ultimate reality.
  4. differentiate between Western and Eastern arguments regarding the existence or non-existence of ultimate reality.
  5. evaluate arguments for the existence of evil.
  6. compare and contrast the similarities and differences between the academic study of religion and the devotional study of religion.
  7. analyze arguments for the existence of evil.
  8. analyze arguments for the existence or non-existence of ultimate reality.
  9. describe the meaning of ¿philosophy of religion¿.
  10. differentiate between Western and Eastern arguments regarding the existence of evil.
  11. differentiate between Western and Eastern arguments regarding the role of reason in religious belief.


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